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Full text of "St Andrew's College Review, Easter 1921"





paster 

V^ 1921 




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REGISTERED 

THE MEN'S SHOP IN THE NEW STORE 

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OVERCOATS and RAINCOATS 



For the College Boy 

London Tailored Overcoats by such famous makers as "Kenneth Durward" 
— "Studd and Millingtcn" — "The Aquascutum" — "The Zembrene" — all 
weights for all seasons — priced from $45 to $76. 

Reliable Raincoats — English Makes $18.50 to $65. 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, Umbrellas, Canes and Travelling Goods. 

FAIRWEATHERS LIMITED 

MONTREAL 88-90 YONGE ST., TORONTO WINNIPEG 






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DIAMOND MERCHANTS 
AND SILVERSMITHS 

Special attention given to Class Pins and 
College Insignia 

SEND FOR OUR BOOKLET : 

" CLUB AND CLASS PINS." 

134-136-138 Yonge Street 
TORONTO 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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IMPERIAL BANK of CANADA 

Capital Paid up - $7,000,000 
Reserve Fund - 7,500,000 
Total Assets over I 30,000,000 



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EVERY BANKING SERVICE IS OFFERED TO STUDENTS 



Nearest Branch to St. Andrew's College is 
South-East corner of Yonge and Bloor Sts. 



H. Morgan, Manager. 



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We are located in the 

North-West 

Residential Section 

of the City 



814 
Phone College Q15 



We have special facilities 
for handling the Laundry 
work of Residential Col- 
leges. Our extensive ex- 
perience and success speak 
for themselves. 



Puritan Laundry Co. 

LIMITED 
BRUNSWICK AVENUE 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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" BUILD STRONG " 

Strength may be Moral, Mental 
or Muscular- 
All are qualities of men of might. Nature's own 
food builds strong bodies. 



For " Milk of Quality " phone us 



College 2040 




Company, Limited 



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RATHBONE U 

o- and Co. •> 
92 Yonge Street 

Importers of 

Exclusive Men's Wear 

FLANNEL and DUCK 

TROUSERS 

SPORT SHIRTS 

and 

BATHING SUITS 

Phone Main 2928 



Class Pins 

The making of Class Pins is big 
business with us. Hundreds of 
different designs to choose from. 
Come in and see them. 



TROPHIES 
PRIZE CUPS 
MEDALS 



SHIELDS 
PENNANTS 

SWEATER CRESTS 



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// you require anything in the 
above, we are sure to please you 
and our prices are tight. 

We welcome suggestions and will 
follow your ideas in special designs, 
if you desii e. 

THE TORONTO 

TROPHY-GRAFT 

COMPANY 

1711 ROYAL BANK BUILDING 

TORONTO 

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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Make Every Journey a Pleasure by Riding a 

"PLANET BICYCLE" 



The exercise of bicycling is just 
the thing. 

There is nothing that will build 
up the muscles and make the 
mind so active and healthful as 
a bicycle ride before and after 
school. 

A first class line of bicycle 
supplies always on hand. 




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THE PLANET BICYCLE CO. 



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69-71 QUEEN STREET E. 

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TORONTO 

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BACON 
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One Whyte 

Packing Co. 

Limited 

66 Front St. East, Toronto 

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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



When You Want the Real Thing 
in Athletic Equipment Look for 
this Trade Mark 




It Stands for the Best and Guarantees Satisfaction and Service 



Baseball, Tennis, Cricket and Golf Supplies, Sweaters, Jerseys, etc. I 

CATALOGUE MAILED ON REQUEST 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

OF CANADA, LIMITED 

207 Yonge Street Toronto 



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{Toronto 



Solicits the orders of Student Societies for 



— PRINTING- 



Invitations, Tickets, 

Programmes, At-Home 

Cards, etc. 



BINDING — 



IN ALL 

ITS 

BRANCHES 



R. J. HAMILTON, B.A. 



Manager 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

The University of Toronto 

(THE PROVINCIAL UNIVERSITY OF ONTARIO) 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and its special departments, offers 
courses or grants degrees in 

Arts — Leading to the degrees of - - B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 

Commerce — ■ Bachelor of Commerce. 

Applied Science and Engineering — B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc, C.E., M.E., 

E.E.Chem.E. 

Medicine— M.B., B.Sc, (Med.) and M.D. 

Education— B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

Forestry — ■ B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

Music — ----- ... Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

Household Science and Social Service. 

Law— - - - - - LL.B..LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.) 

Dentistry— - - D.D.S. 

Agriculture — - B.S.A. 

Veterinary Science — B.V.S. and D.Y.S. 

Pharmacy— - - - Phm.B. 



Teachers' Classes, Correspondence Work, ana Summer 
Sessions are arranged for the special benefit of teachers in service. Evening tutorial 
classes and study groups (for those in Toronto who wish to take advantage of them), single 
lectures and courses o1 lectures, (for outside cities and towns) are also arranged, so far as 
possible. (For information regarding these write the Director, University Extension). 

For general information and copies of calendars, write the Registrar, University of 
Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges of Faculties. 



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The Best Heads at St. Andrew' 
College are wearing 

JESS APPLEGATH 

HATS 



SOLE AGENT FOR 

Famous Ross Silk Lined 
Soft Hat or Derby 



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Battersby Hats 



COMPLETE RANGE OF 

John B. Stetson's 

AND 

Borsalino Hats 

85 Yonge Street 

Near King Street 

MONTREAL STORE 

473 ST. CATHERINE ST. W. 

ISC 



DAVENPORT ROAD 

Foot of Maimer Rd. Hill 



Finest in Canada 
H ELECTRIC DELIVERY 

No Stable No Horses 
No Odors 



The Harry Webb Co., Ltd. 



TELEPHONE 
HILLCREST 



5000 



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WEBB'S H 

Great New Bakery 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




CLOTH 



TAKH P.l.tVATOP 

IV here Your 
Dollars Go 
Their Actual 
Limit in Actual 
Value Buying 

\Y/"E guarantee you a saving — 
when you huy clothes in 
our Upstairs Clothes Shop, 2nd 
Floor Kent Building — a saving 
that should interest every eco- 
nomical college man — it's a sav- 
ing that counts — a saving that 
every man should demand for 
his money. 

Because of our low rent and 
selling expenses and our ex- 
tremely close margins of profit, 
our clothes are unequalled from 
every viewpoint — for price, 
style, workmanship and fabric. 

You can always buy good clothes 
tor less money at Pascoes— or your 
money back. The constantly increas- 
ing number of men who are coming 
here for their clothes proves that we 
are living up to this motto. 




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pAscoES 

,P~ ^ CLOTHES SHOP^ V^ 



Second Floor Kent Buildinq - 
Corner YONGEand RICHMOND STREETS 



Cfje g>t gnbreto'* College 

Review 




Carter, 1921 



Editorial JBoarfc 

MR. A. R. RAMSEY 
R. H. ANDERSON F. R. DAYMENT 

J. H. SUPPLE J- V. RUSSELL 

D. H. FINDLAY W. A. BEER 

A. G. FINDLEY F. O. SISSONS 

K. B. CARSON 

^Business Managers 

E. G. SMITH R. S. EARLE 

F. R. GRAYSON J. A. CAMERON 

Issued by the Editorial Beard 
EVERY CHRISTMAS, EASTER AND MIDSUMMER 



Carter, 1921 



TABU- OF CONTENTS 
Frontispiece: The First Hockey Team 

Editorials 11 

Chinese Marriages 13 

The Caged Bird 15 

The Silent Reminder 10 

Saint Vincent 19 

A Day and a Night 21 

What the Moon Saw 23 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 25 

The Thumb-Box 28 

Lab Day 30 

Detention 32 

The School 35 

Hockey 44 

Our Old Boys 58 

Exchanges 63 

Pro Omnibus Nostris Beneficiis ' 66 

Skits 08 

Lo\yer School Skits 77 



St. Andrew's College Review 

Easter, 1921 



EDITORIALS. 

At least, from the school-bay's point of view, Dame Nature has 
been exceedingly unkind ; she has not humoured us with hale and 
vigorous weather. With soft ice for a day or so, and then the mer- 
cury rising to a height which melted everything, making the rink 
present the appearance of a pond, we have experienced the mildest 
of winters. Apart from two meagre falls of snow which by no 
means made tobogganing or skiing possible, the landscape has not 
this year been in the clutches of Jack Frost. As a result, outdoor 
exercise has been constrained, and we have been prone to grum- 
ble. On the other hand, our teams were able to have practice hours 
at the Arena, and have completed a season of which we are justly 
unashamed. 

Already the signs of real spring are here, and with eagerness 
we look forward to the fast-approaching summer term. Realizing 
that it is a time of glorious weather, with long bright days in which 
we can enjoy the charm of out-door freedom, we will return from 
the welcome Easter holidays with added zest. 



The Review takes this opportunity of mentioning that Dr. Mac- 
donald completed in February his twenty-first year as headmaster 
of St. Andrew's College. In those years the school has witnessed 
many important changes and a marvellous development. He as- 
sumed office in the Yonge Street building under rather adverse 
conditions, and with a school of about forty boys. To such a foun- 
dation he added a zest and personal influence which has been largely 
responsible for the growth and present prosperity of the college. 

After many successful years in the Rosedale building, we were 
obliged to move to Knox College. One can hardly realize the many 
difficulties of such a task, but when one considers that the com- 
plete change was made without the loss of a single day in the ses- 

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12 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

sion, it is apparent that the headmaster's leadership was an im- 
portant factor. The two years' sojourn and the subsequent return 
to the old buildings were further evidences of his skilful control. 

The boys of the school are aware that they have in Dr. Mac- 
donald a headmaster whose personality compels esteem, and who is, 
in all that the term implies, a man. In the years to come may he 
ever be conscious of our desire to offer him our respectful co- 
operation. 



Having witnessed a term, such as this has been, one cannot help 
noticing that on dreary afternoons there is an increasing num- 
ber of boys who seem seldom to experience the luxury of reading. 
They are content with idly loafing, and constantly watch for an 
opportunity to interfere. They belong to the class which is always 
looking for trouble, and as might be expected, easily find it. Are 
they not missing one of the most profitable pastimes of boyhood? 
There are those who are not even familiar with Tom Sawyer! and 
among the higher heroes, they are strangely friendless. The won- 
drously woven plot of a good novel is one of the worlds they have 
not explored. Works by authors accepted as standard are unknown 
to them beyond the mysterious titles. 

On a gloomy evening, when the weather is inclement, the ideal 
companion is the character which comes forth from the covers of 
a book, and acts for us with vividness made possible by a master 
pen. Human company is" not always possible, and in such a plight 
the boy who cannot enter the storyland of books must needs be. 
sadly alone. 

As the years flit by and we enter the autumn of life, think how 
enriched he is who takes with him the unobtrusive friends who 
never forsake, and who at all times are willing to offer sincere com- 
panionship. When one considers the richness of the English lan- 
guage, and the resulting legion of books on every subject written 
by the greatest writers of any country, does he not realize the won- 
derful heritage that is his in an English tongue? Surely one would 
do well to avail himself of the wonderful opportunities presented in 
English Literature. 

F. Roper Dayment. 



CHINESE MARRIAGES. 

The marriage ceremony in the Far East differs greatly from 
the marriage of the West. Instead of an acquaintanceship ripening 
into affection, the whole affair in China is arranged by a profes- 
sional "go-between" or "match-maker," who makes it her business 
(it is always a woman) to know all the marriageable young people 
of the neighbourhood. When a young man becomes of an age when 
his parents consider that he should marry, they go to a match- 
maker and state their case. The match-maker goes over her list 
of suitable young ladies, chooses one, and then takes the case to her 
parents (the prospective bride's) who, if favourably inclined to- 
wards the terms, consult their family soothsayer as to how the 
compact will turn out, and, if this man is agreeable, the affair is 
well-nigh terminated. 

The prospective groom now has two cards made upon which are 
painted dragons, the symbol of fidelity, and also on these cards are 
complete particulars of the agreement. These cards are bound 
with red silk cord. One of the cards he presents to the bride. 
The use of the silk cord has a very interesting legend connected 
with it. It appears that about the year 618 B.C., in the days of the 
Chow dynasty, there lived in the town of Sung, one called Haw Ki, 
who one night came upon an old man sitting in front of a tea house 
reading a huge book by the light of the moon. "In this book," 
said the old man to How Ki, "are all the marriages for years to 
come, and with this cord" — producing a red silk cord — "shall the 
mated couples be bound together. Now, your wife is at present in 
the house of an old woman who sells vegetables at the North Gate." 
How Ki immediately hurried to the house of the old woman, where 
he found an exceedingly ugly girl baby, and was so alarmed that he 
hired a coolie to kill the child. Many years later, How Ki was pre- 
sented with a beautiful young wife by the governor. He noticed 
she always wore a rose over her forehead, and asked her the reason 
why, to which she replied : "Several years ago, when I was living 
with an old vegetable woman, I was out walking one day, when a 
ruffian rushed at me and made the scar on my forehead, which I 
always cover by a rose." Then did How Ki realize that Fate could 
not be cheated. 

The arrangements for the marriage made, a few months 
elapse, during which the interchange of presents takes place until 

13 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



the great day arrives. As yet the groom has not even seen the 
bride. She leaves her father's house in her carriage, and is met 
about half-way by the groom who takes possession of her carriage. 
This performance is a last remnant of the possession by capture of 
ancient times. In Northern China the custom is even more pro- 
nounced, and is carried out by having the groom chase the bride 
on horseback for a reasonable distance. Another variation is to 
have the groom chase the bride through the rooms and halls of her 
father's house while old women playfully try to trip, and generally 
hinder him. Arriving at the house of the groom's father they seat 
themselves in front of the family altar, each endeavouring to sit on 
the fringe of the other's coat; the one succeeding, it is said, will be 
ruler of the household. 

The next half hour is devoted to sacrifices and prayers at the 
altar, at the conclusion of these the ceremony is considered to be 
ended and the guests give themselves up to feasting and merry- 
making. Blake M. Wilson. 




RECKSS HOUR AT THE TICK 




THE CACED BIRD 



I look out of my turret window and see the rushing motors on 
the boulevard without; gaiety is in the air, but the heart in my 
bosom palpitates not with joy, nay! with sorrow — I am gated. 
This verb may not be familiar to all, but it is very much like C. B. 
which a disorderly soldier receives. It means that a poor school- 
boy is actually confined to the college over the week-end and forced 
to report each hour to a master. 

The Man in the Iron Mask led a life of hilarity compared to my 
unhappy existence this day. I have done nothing, only skipped 
down town so that I could write a composition on the Royal Bank 
Building, neglecting to get leave or to consult a master as to the 
propriety of such a course. I contemplate the vivid world without 
— and suicide — at the same time. If I committed suicide, gatings 
would be abolished as a barbarous practice ; but what benefit would 
that be to me? No, I will entice some other gated person with less 
intellect than myself (probably very hard to find) to commit 
suicide, and I shall reap the benefits of his fatal expedient. 

I wonder how I shall spend my time. I might wash and shave, 
but that is not my idea of amusement. I might whistle to girls as 
they toddle by (if the master is out of earshot) or I might study! 
The last is the intention of every gated person, but it seldom ma- 
terializes because the only chaps who have the will-power to study 
are never gated. Gating is a manifestation of the struggle between 
authority and the pitiful objects on which authority is directed. I 
am one of those pitiful objects. If Shakespeare were alive to-day, 
with gatings as his theme, and one of my school fellows as a hero, 
he could write such a tragedy as would make "Hamlet" look like 
"Listen Lester." 

Sometimes a kind-hearted master sends you on an errand for 
bird-seed or pea-nuts, and gives you a little fresh air between re- 
ports. Still, I swear now that I shall never skip out again, but 
next week temptation will come in the shape of Hink Russell, and 
next Saturday I will be poking a tear-stained countenance within 
the Masters' Common Room and saying, "Report, Sir." 

K. B. Carson. 



1.5 



^® 




It hangs upon my bed-room wall, that old sword about which 
I am going to relate a short history. There is nothing pretentious 
about its hilt, no jewels set there in wondrous device, nor inlaid 
gold upon the blade. It is just an old cavalry sabre, with leather 
scabbard bound with steel, old, worn, and shaggy, not from age 
alone, but rather from the life it led at the waist of its master. 
The blade is nicked and scarred, not from children playing war 
and charging barricades of iron cots in their nurseries, but from 
having been crossed in deadly combat with opposing steel. It has 
been relegated to many olcl store-rooms throughout the decades of 
its retired existence, but when thus treated, it has been at the 
hands of those ignorant of its birthright, or if knowing, heeding 
not. Now it has returned to its heritage, commanding respect as 
it hangs in state over a silhouette of its master of one hundred 
years ago ; and as I sit in the gathering gloom of the short winter 
twilight it seems to me I hear it whisper of deeds of valour wit- 
nessed by it, deeds which have been carved by men in the everlast- 
ing rock of time. 

Yes, that old sword stands as a link between the present and the 
past ; that uncertain time when Napoleon with his legions advanced 
over the Pyrenees with intent to crush the Spanish kingdom. It 
was then that the skill of that military genius, Sir John Moore was 
summoned to cope with the onrushing flood of invaders, and not 
in vain. Military genius is useless without the human power and 
will to carry out its plans, and Sir John had these assets, together 
with valiant men who had implicit faith in their commander. 

The march of the little British army to Astorga to cross the 
path of the advancing three hundred thousand, and its steady re- 
treat on Corunna gave ample room for heroism and proof of worth 
both in man and blade. Many fell under the test, but a brave rem- 

16 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 17 

nant survived. At Corunna no ships awaited the fever-stricken 
British forces, and again that war-weary force had to 
turn about and fight. It was a splendid fight; shot and 
shell hurled from unseen barricades fell like a metal rain. 
But the dark clouds of defeat were just breaking when fate exacted 
her price. It was at the very dawn of victory when Sir John Moore 
received his death wound. He died happy in the realization that 
the day was not lost, and that throughout his career he had fought 
a good fight, the thought which brings more contentment to the 
mind than any communion or prayers given at the bedside for the 
believed redemption of the soul. There was to be no military 
funeral for him; his desire was to be buried in the ramparts of 
Corunna at the dead of night. 

Picture, if you can, a squad of sad and weary soldiers wending 
their way towards the outskirts of a shell-torn city carrying be- 
tween them the lifeless body of their beloved commander, the lurid 
light from bursting shells, the misty moon-light through the smoke 
and the rays of a solitary lantern, to reveal the way. 

"We buried him darkly at the dead of night 
The sods with our bayonets turning." 

But now through the gloom, as the last faint streaks of red and 
gold have faded from the western sky, giving place to the cold, 
dark grey of the fast-falling night, where a few minutes before 
there dwelt in all its glory a superb winter's sunset, and as the 
night takes on the mantle of storm I imagine the scene which the 
old sabre witnessed on a similar night five score years and ten 
before, when a great man's life went through the same changes 
that the sky has just undergone. 

The last scene in the drama of the sword's owner was 
staged on the moors of Northern England, the actor, a 
major of the British forces in Spain. Shortly after his 
return from the burial of his commander he had received 
his seventh wound while riding along the lines endeavour- 
ing to cheer his men. His faithful horse was shot from be- 
neath him, and at the same moment the rider was shot through the 
breast. The following day he was transported to England, where 
his wife and family awaited him forty miles from the port of his 
disembarkation. The journey was attempted by coach, but the 
jarring proved too great an agony for him to bear, his wound 
having become inflamed with exposure and neglect, and he aban- 
doned the stage and set his face against the chilling blast. The gale 



18 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



hurled in the face of the traveller a sleet, stinging and blinding, but 
he must fight on till the end, until the haven of rest is reached, 
whether it was to be his old home, with its loving welcome, warmth 
and care, or eternal rest in the arms of death. 

Weak from the long drawn-out campaign, soul-weary, wounded 
and sick, he staggered, stumbled but fought on. This was his last 
fight, and he was facing it alone. The old sabre hung at his waist, 
helpless to aid him here, in fact, it was rather a hindrance to his 
progress, but it had been his friend, faithful and true, in many 
other fights. Why should it be discarded now? The bond between 
them was too great, and it remained at his side. The storm con- 
tinued in its fury, but on, on, on he struggled against it and against 
forces which nature was raising up to defeat him. But defeat 
was not to find an easy victim for there was a goal to be reached 
that night. In spite of his will he was losing; .the little strength 
which remained to him was fast ebbing, and then all drifted into 
oblivion. He awoke, a sense of silence filled the air, the storm was 
abating, and in the distance a light was gleaming like a star re- 
vealing the pathway to happiness and peace. He knew it to be his 
guiding star and with an effort born of despair he raised himself 
and struggled forward till his long-fought-for goal was reached — 
home. 

Major died two days later. His last campaign with the 

elements had proved too hard a task for his weakened powers of 
endurance. But there remains to us a relic, the old sabre, a silent 
reminder of his noble career. 

E. G. Tyrer. 















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,r*i :"*s 



SAINT VINCENT. 

Saint Vincent, one of the British West Indies, lies a little south 
of Barbados. It has a population of about 50,000, of which about 
32,000 are white, 10,000 black, 7,000 coloured, and 1,000 East In- 
dian coolies. There are also a few Caribs of somewhat mixed blood, 
the aboriginal Caribs having been deported to British Honduras in 
1797. Kingstown, the capital, situated on a bay at the south- 
western extremity of the island, has a population of about 7,000. 

The climate is healthful, the coolest time of the year being from 
December till May; the wet season is from August till November! 
The average annual rainfall is 111.82 inches. Sugar and arrow- 
root are the principal products. Other articles of export are cocoa, 
cotton, spices, fruit, vegetables, live stock and poultry. 

Saint Vincent is divided by a high mountain ridge, running 
from north to south, at the northern end is the Soufriere, which 
rises to about 3,000 feet in the centre of the island, and dominates 
both the leeward and windward districts. The Soufriere has two 
craters, the old and the new, the latter lying south-east of the for- 
mer having been formed by the eruption of 1812. The craters are 
divided by an exceedingly knife-like ridge, along which it requires 
a cool head to creep. The old crater, three miles in circumference, 
contains a lake, some several hundred feet below the edge, and over 
which clouds and vapour constantly hover. The new crater, smaller 
than its neighbour, but more rugged and precipitous, looks, as it 
has been graphically described, like "an opening into the great in- 
fernal regions." At the leeward base of the Soufriere lie the 
estates of Wallibou and Richmond, also Morne Ronde, the settle- 
ment of the Caribs, and to the south-west, the small town of 
Chateaubellair, while on the windward side are the great sugar 
estates of the island, 'and to the extreme north, the arrowroot 
estates of Owia and Fancy. Almost opposite to Chateaubellair, on 
the windward coast, is Georgetown, the second town of Saint Vin- 
cent. The Soufriere may be said to have at least one-third of the 
island within its range of possible destruction. Premonitory signs 
of eruption had been given since February, 1901, when shocks of 
earthquakes and deep reverberations were felt ; but as they passed 
away, little attention was given to them. These warnings were re- 
peated as soon as the Mont Pelee volcano at Martinique showed 
activity, and increased in force until May 6th, when all doubts as 

19 



20 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



to their true meaning were dissipated. At 3 p.m. on that day huge 
columns of smoke were seen from Chateaubellair to issue from the 
old crater, followed by streams of flame. So serious was the situa- 
tion, that several officials were sent from the capital, Kingstown, 
15 miles away, to report upon what was happening, and they found 
the mountain in full eruption. Early on the following morning 
the eruption ceased, and left the surrounding country in gloom. 
So far the windward side had escaped with little damage. Shortly 
after eight the volcano cnce more burst into activity, its full force 
being experienced from one o'clock to three o'clock p.m. For more 
than 400 miles the sound as of heavy cannonading at sea was heard 
throughoutthe West Indies. In Kingstown lamps had to be lighted 
from four o'clock in the afternoon, and ashes fell in Barbados, 
which lies about 100 miles to the windward of Saint Vincent. On 
the windward side the estate works at Tourama, Orange Hill, and 
Lot 14 were completely destroyed; on the leeward side Wallibou 
was covered up, and the chimney at Richmond was the sole sign of 
the works. 

A Mansion House Fund was at once started in London for the 
relief of the sufferers, and subscriptions were sent from all parts of 
the civilized world, so that within a few years normal conditions 
were regained. 

H. E. Hazell. 




THE COMMITTEE OF PI BLIC SAFETY. 



A DAY AND A NIGHT; OR, THE ADVENTURES OF 

AN ANDREAN. 

The trials of a boarder, as most of you are aware, are supposed 
to begin at 7.15 a.m. ; but more usually that happy mortal remains 
in blissful slumber until the sound of the Breakfast Bell disturbs 
his calm repose. 

With the Breakfast Bell comes a short battle as to who shall 
close the windows, and then all is in a turmoil. A rush to the 
wash-room, a lick-and-a-promise there, with usually the ears and 
neck utterly ignored. Then a short skirmish with clothes, etc., and 
a hundred yard dash, which, as a rule, terminates in your tripping 
over the laces of one of your boots, and lands you in a graceful 
sprawl on the floor just as the dining room door is shut in your 
face. When the now unhappy victim picks himself up and enters 
the dining room on tiptoe, the watchful master has his eye on the 
door and all hope of gaining his seat without detention vanishes. 

Breakfast over, the beds must be made and the rooms cleaned 
up. The boots have to be placed in iine on a shelf and all papers, 
and the remains of the feed of the preceding night, done away with. 
At 9 o'clock a kindly master visits each room and soaks you a few 
odd hours for that pin on the floor, that crease in your bedspread, 
or that boot that is one-sixteenth of an inch out of its place. 
When he departs he leaves a sad group of boys behind him, com- 
paring notes, in order to see who has the most detention, and plan- 
ning how they can best get out of it. 

The roll is called in your class room at 9.15, and many quite, 
original excuses for lateness are offered to the form master. This 
is followed by morning prayers and then school. Many wish that 
all schools could be blown into space, and I agree with them, but 
I am sure we should regret this wish in later years. Very little 
can be said about school as it is a very painful subject in more than 
one way. At recess there is a mad rush for the Tuck Shop, the only 
place where one can eat without getting detention for being late or 
making a noise. After school, the time between 3.30 and 5.00 is 
usually spent in some class room writing lines, or doing work for 
some master, but occasionally, there is some time left for other 
forms of sport. 

At 6.15 you have dinner and soon after study commences. The 
two hours of study are usually spent in unspeakable agony. Vari- 

21 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



ous forms of amusement are attempted, from asking the master 
foolish questions to seeing how much detention you can amass in 
one evening. The last half-hour is usually spent in counting the 
minutes and seconds till the bell rings. At 9.15 the bell rings and 
you have evening prayers where fellows are usually reminded of 
certain engagements with the house-master, or of certain rules 
broken. 

After prayers you then retire to your rooms and lights are put 
out at 10.00; but that does not mean that you go to sleep then. 
Sometimes friendly (?) visits are made by the inmates of some 
other room and somebody emerges a little the worse for wear. 
After a while all is quiet and you become dead to the world. Thus 
ends a Perfect Day. 

E. R. McLelland. 




THE HAT TRICK. 



WHAT THE MOON SAW. 

It was June, and the sun, as if reluctant to rest after such a 
long day of brightness, was slowly moving westward. Gradually 
the shadows were lengthening, the images of the oaks on the face 
of the old beaver pond became colour schemes of green and gold, 
and soon all that remained of the ball of fire, that had ridden tri- 
umphant in the sky all day, was a blood-red glow far out to the 
west. 

An hour afterwards, as if daylight was coming again, a bright- 
ness appeared in the east, and the moon peeping up over the jagged 
top of Old Sugar Loaf Mountain, bathed the New England hills in 
its silvery glow. The oaks became patterns of midnight blue and 
silver, while the beaver pond, long since unfamiliar with its orig- 
inal builders, was a smooth sheet of burnished silver. Nothing 
marred the peace and beauty of the scene. Far down in the valley, 
the farm houses nestled as if in some great cradle, and up in the 
hills the trees standing straight and sentinel-like wove bright pat- 
terns on the ground beneath them. 

To look at the smiling face of the The Man in the Moon, one 
can never tell the various tragedies, or comedies, he looks down 
upon. To-night, as he floated serenely through his canopy of clear, 
clean blue, his impartial eye saw a little woodland scene enacted, 
which, although in itself is very common, has not to the denizens of 
the woods, lost its terrible meaning. It was in a little glade on the 
south side of one of the hills where a bright spot was formed in 
the dark shadows of the sighing evergreens. This space at first 
seemed to be devoid of life, but to the Man in the Moon, as he 
floated on, it presented a scene full of activity. Under the thickest 
of the evergreens his rays quickly discovered something of interest. 
It was a family of cotton taijs, making a first acquaintance with the 
great world they were to live in. Leading them was the nervous 
mother who, raised on her capable hind feet, was wig-wagging her 
long ears listening for the first signs of danger that would harm 
her precious offspring. To the casual observer there would have 
seemed to be no danger, but the Man in the Moon could have told 
him differently; he knew that the old stump down the slope was 
not all stump, he could have told you that closer inspection would 
reveal the top stub to be old Kimoskees, the owl. He also would 
have informed anybody who could have questioned him that a fox 

23 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



was skulking along on the other side of the ridge, to say nothing 
of a bloodthirsty weasel coming up wind in search of food. 

Suddenly, out of the silence there came a great booniing, it 
seemed to have no definite source, and yet to pervade everywhere. 
A significant silence followed it; a great disaster seemed to be 
pending. The stub of the stump had suddenly vanished, and over 
the top of the trees, Kimoskees was heading towards the glade, 
where the baby cotton tails, with much leaping and thumping, were 
sampling the sweet bits of clover of which their fastidious palates 
approved most highly. While yet a great distance away the Moon 
saw the owl change his route and head for the big evergreen which 
sheltered the rabbit family. He flew with the noiselessness of a bit 
of wind-blown thistle down, nothing heralded his coming. The 
Moon cast his shadow over the glade to warn his victims, but too 
late, a swoop and a squeak, and the rabbit family scurrying back 
to the shelter of their brier patch was bereft of one of its members. 
Still up in his seat of vantage the Moon sailed on, his smile not 
one whit changed. Perhaps he realized that old truth, "The 
strong \all prey on the weak ;" or perhaps -he may have favoured 
the o . . Or, again, maybe he doesn't think anything — who knows ? 

Armstrong. 




ALL READY FOR MORNING INSPECTION. 



UNCLE TOM'S CABIN. 

Uncle Tom's Cabin, the stupendous tragedy, with Caroline 
Heaveaway playing the role of the child, Eva. See the finest spe- 
cial scenery that eyes of mortal man ever gazed upon! See Lew 
Prune, as Lawyer Marks, screamingly funny ! Beware of the fero- 
cious bloodhounds ! ! So say the hand-bills distributed by a dys- 
peptic-looking crook who has been stopping for the past week at 
the Seaside Hotel. 

The great day comes and the company arrives in town. First, 
we see a down-at-the-heels negro porter, who plays the role of 




.18 



.faVv 



Uncle Tom; then, a long-nosed tramp with the appearance of an 
undertaker, this is the famous comedian, Lew Prune (Lawyer 
Marks) ; then appear several sometime inmates of an old lacjies' 
home. The eldest of these ladies is Caroline Heaveaway, fifty-six 
if she's a day ; she takes the part of Little Eva. The manager of 
the company, a corpulent creature, goes to the box car of the train 
and leads out the three blood hounds ; they were old when Harriet 
Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin. The whole company 
piles into the town hack and is driven to the Seaside Hotel. 

The next day comes the great parade ; all the youngsters strive 
to get places in it, and thus have the honour of wearing one of the 
moth-eaten, ex-military coats, or to lead one of the fierce, but 

25 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



thoothless, blood hounds. Lawyer Marks, with a trombone, and 
Uncle Tom, with a big drum, lead the procession which marches all 
around the town with banners inscribed, "Uncle Tom's Cabin in 
tthe Town Hall to-night." There is great excitement when one of 
the dogs develops hydrophobia, and thus ends the parade. 

That Night. 

A perspiring audience awaits the raising of the curtain. Fin- 
ally it rises, disclosing what is supposed to be an aristocratic south- 
ern home, with Uncle Tom dusting the stuffed owl in the corner ; 
the southern aristocrat (who looks like a bar-tender) sips a mint 
julep from a pickle bottle, and discusses with a slave-buyer the sale 




of Uncle Tom. The whole scene conveys a sense of opulence, from 
the table (which the Sons and Daughters of the Morning use at 
their monthly meeting) to the hump-backed arm-chair borrowed 
from the Seaside Hotel. 

Soon comes the scene on the ice-strewn river, and Eliza makes 
her sensational dash for freedom. She skips across the ice pur- 
sued by the relentless bloodhounds while she tenderly carries little 
Harry (a whisky bottle wrapped in a piece of rag) in her arms. 
Her escape draws tremendous applause from every member of the 
audience. 

Uncle Tom arrives at the house of St. Clair, and Little Eva and 
Topsy make their appearance. Topsy claims that she wasn ? t born 
but "just growed." Judging by her appearance she began to grow 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 27 

about the time of the wars of the Roses. She shocks by her girlish 
antics, St. Clair's New England cousin. But now tears dim every 
eye as Little Eva is dying with Uncle Tom sobbing at her feet (size 
ten) . Then she dies but, unfortunately, in her ascent to heaven the 
ropes go wrong and Caroline Heaveaway's one hundred and eighty 
pounds does untold damage to the stage floor. The curtain falls 
upon a scene of wild disorder. 

Now follows the great scene in the slave market where Uncle 
Tom stands up on a biscuit box while the manager of the company, 
armed with a tack hammer, acts as auctioneer. Simon Legree 
stands around cracking a long black whip and finally buys poor old 
Uncle Tom. 

The scenes on Legree's plantation are very sad, and the town 
undertaker wishes that he could have been alive and in business at 
that time for Uncle Tom, Little Eva and St. Clair all die within 
the short space of fifteen minutes. The play ends and the people 
leave while the manager counts the admission money to see whether 
it will pay his hotel bill. 

The dramatic critic for the Weekly Bugle wrote as follows : 
"Huge crowds attend first night presentation of Uncle Tom's Cabin 
at the Town Hall !" Thus read the headlines. "Caroline Heave- 
away, the noted juvenile actress, well known to the play-goers of 
our town for the past half century, was up to her usual wonder- 
ful form. The German accent of Uncle Tom, who once lived in 
Cincinnati, was greatly admired by all. 

"A regrettable incident was Hank Beavan's demand for the re- 
funding of his money, which he received from Manager Cookit (in 
order to prevent a riot) . This was the only incident to mar the en- 
joyment of the evening. Dr. Killem is attending Miss Heaveaway 
who nearly broke her neck in the second act. On account of this 
incident the company will put on 'Hamlet' to-morrow night and 
later 'Ten Nights in a Bar-room,' unless Miss Heaveaway recovers." 

K. B. Carson. 



THE THUMB-BOX. 



In one corner of a large art gallery the artists have a quiet little 
room, which is away from the noise of the surging crowds. Here 
they exhibit their "thumb-box"pictures and often gather for tea 
and conversation. If you break away from the massive portraits, 
large canvasses, and historical tapestries of the main gallery, and 
seek out this restful spot, you will enjoy the smaller pictures, and 
discover that there are untold possibilities in the thumb-box. 




This quaint room is not only furnished in the most attractive 
style, but has a friendly atmosphere, as if it invited you to stop 
a moment and catch the spirit of the artists. There are long tables 
with current magazines on art as well as sets of books dealing with 
the technical side of the subject. Clustered around are numerous 

28 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



29 



Windsor chairs, and over yonder, a many-cushioned divan. That 
silverware is the tea-service used when they meet to discuss each 
other's work, and offer suggestions for improvement. Notice, too, 
that brass samovar, with the curious tap and vertical chimney. 

At one side, nodding her head to every visitor, sits a dear old 
lady in charge of the exhibition. Her snowy hair and genial smile 
are themselves a picture. And she is writing at such an odd desk 
with its open top and bookcases above. You might easily call it an 
old-fashioned secretary. Several cheery paintings are hung above 
her, and at her elbow is a miniature orange plant, adding its vivid 
colour to the cozy picture. 

Her answers concerning- the pictures lead one to believe that 
she is in close touch with the artists and has their interests at heart. 
One may buy almost any one of the pictures, which are done in all 
the mediums from pastel to oils, and appropriately framed. 

If you listen to the opinions of fellow artists, you will not fail to 
notice the candid criticism of colour-blending and composition in 
each of the thumtnbox pictures. The spirit of sincere helpfulness 
prompts each designer to analyze the other paintings and the artist 
spirit plainly shows itself in its devotion to expression through the 
brush and crayon. Surely here is a company of people who have, 
by a happy chance, discovered one of the highest things in life; 
and believing it to be such, give it their whole soul. 

F. Roper Dayment, 




THE FALCONS 




S- 




LAB DAY 



Aha ! It is Wednesday. To-day we go down to the lab. 

As soon as the period bell rings we are off. Down the stairs 
with a rush, and then we bring up with a bang against the lab. 
door. Mr. G. is not quite through with the Upper Sixth, but he 
soon lets us in. 

The lab. has various characteristics. The main one is its smell. 
This changes, but is always present. Another is its temperature. 
The lab. is always very cold, except when something catches fire 
— consequently the cold doesn't bother us much. 

The voice of authority rings out. "Now, boys, I don't wish to 
speak very long before I set you to work. But you remember last 
day, we passed chlorine through a solution of caustic potash. I 
would just like to show you the result. Now here is the ah! — let 
me see. No! this is it — Tyrer, will you please test this solution 
for chloride?" Tyrer puts some of what he has found into a test- 
tube and fixes it in a stand. 

Tyrer : "If you please — look this way. If there is chloride pres- 
ent when I pour a little of this in, a white precipitate will form." 
He pauses and squints at the test-tube. He then pours in something 
out of a bottle. The stuff fizzes up, subsides and begins to give off 
dense, dangerous looking fumes. Soon we see little flashes of light 
and it begins to fizz again. (Tyrer wisely jumps into the fume 
closet and closes the glass door. We all duck behind our desks.) 

The stuff is still sparkling, and then, all of a sudden — BANG! 
When the smoke clears away we see Tyrer serenely climbing out of 
the fume closet. "There wasn't," he says. After the -panic has sub- 
sided Mr. G. says: "Well! now for to-day. I have been looking 
through your notes and I intend to set you to do the experiments 
I think you did most poorly ; start with this bench." "Tyrer, you 
and Beer can make chlorine, be very careful, you know, not to let 
any escape." And so on. Each pair is instructed and the bustle 
begins. Over in the corner you hear someone saying: "You didn't, 
I got it first." "You're crazy, that's been on our desk all along." 

30 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 31 

"Oh ! go swallow some nitric, keep it then. Here's another, any- 
way." 

And so the bustle continues until, BANG ! crash ! tinkle, tinkle. 
And then Mr. G.'s voice rises above the rest. 

"Who was that?" 

Someone replies, "Us, sir, we were making chlorine." 

Mr. G. throws open two windows and a door. Notwithstand- 
ing the open windows and door there is a general retreat. The 
master leads us into the next room. We soon return, but only to 
find that the bottom of Robinson's carefully prepared apparatus has 
fallen out through overheating. Later, when Anderson is endeav- 
ouring to cut off a piece of phosphorous the whole stick takes fire 
and there is much excitement. In time there is quiet again, and we 
resume our work. Mr. G. catches Walker wandering about the 
room, and says: "What are you doing, Walker?" Walker replies, 
"I'm just looking for a bottle of radium, I have a wart on my little 
finger." 

At the top of the bench, Mr. G. is busy preparing a very dis- 
agreeable and poisonous substance called bromine, with which he 
intends to show us some experiments. As explosions have been the 
order for the day, we are now beginning to think it is about time 
we had another. One is straightway forthcoming. There is a 
light pop at the master's desk, and then an explosion. This time, 
when the pieces have all fallen, and the smoke has cleared away, 
Mr. G. is being carried off to the sick room on a stretcher, leaving 
the boys to clean up the lab. 

This they do, of course, almost completely. 



DETENTION 




People talk of some things being as easy as rolling off a log, but 
I can assure you that getting an hour's detention is just about 
fourteen and a half times easier. The writer is thoroughly famil- 
iar with his subject and knows what it is to be gated on Saturday, 
have his pocket money stopped, five hour's work to do and numer- 
ous other penalties to be paid. 

Here are a few suggestions for any one desirous of tasting the 
bitterness of detention : wink in study, eat your breakfast, talk in 
your sleep, snore, fall down stars, or smile when a master tries to 
crack a joke. For any of these offences you are liable to receive 
from one to five hours' detention, according to the mood in which 
the master happens to be. 

The commandments of school life are many. A few of them 
are as follows : 

Thou shalt love no other school. 

Honour thy masters that thine hours may be short in the house 
of detention. 

Thou shalt take a bath before thy room-mates make thee. 

Thou shalt not lie (after the breakfast bell has sounded). 

Thou shalt wear a bowler hat on Sunday. 

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's Latin book, nor his French 
exercise, nor his pencil, nor anything that is thy neighbor's. 

There are, all told, one hundred and ten commandments, but 
the above will give you a fair idea of what you must not do to avoid 
receiving detention. But, after all, what is the good of detention ? 
You have to sit in a hot stuffy room ; this must be injurious to your 
health. You write so rapidly that your arm becomes cramped and 
that beautiful copper-plate writing of which you were so justly 
proud soon develops into an illegible scrawl. I firmly believe that 
detention should be abolished ; it puts you in a bad humour, does not 
increase your love for the master, and, besides, it wears out your 
trousers. H. R. Sprott. 



32 



St. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



33 




SMALL TOWN STIFF 




•MITH I. — HEAD PREFECT I920-I92I. 
34 



The School 



"GERRY" SMITH— HEAD PREFECT. 

We publish on the opposite page a very good likeness of our 
Head Prefect, Smith I., more popularly known as "Gerry." Being 
Head Prefect of a school like St. Andrew's is a big job, but Smith 
very ably fills the position. It is doubtful if there is a busier man 
north of the second bridge than this same Gerry. He ranks high 
in his form — the Upper Sixth ; is captain of the Cadet Corps ; man- 
ages the hockey team ; is business manager of the Review ; is on the 
executive of the Athletic Association and the Literary Society; a 
member of numerous other committees, and last, but by no means 
least, plays the drum in the college orchestra. 

But we have enumerated only the minor activities of the Head 
Prefect. His most important sphere is that of the medium 
through whom the boys voice their requests and complaints to the 
Headmaster. In this capacity Smith exhibits the utmost tact and 
diplomacy. This is not the first time we have had a Smith in the 
role of Head Prefect. If they are all as good as Gerry we hope we 
shall soon have another. 



THE LITERARY SOCIETY. 

The first meeting of the Literary Society for the season of 
1920-21 was held on Friday evening, November 18th. A short 
programme was given, but the time was largely taken up in the 
election of officers. The performers on this occasion were chiefly 
new boys, Proudfoot being much in evidence. Scott, on the violin, 
rendered several good numbers, some of which were suspected of 
being of his own composition. Brunt spoke on his home village, 
Hanover, and Anderson gave a good speech on the College Street 
House. 

The second meting was held on Friday, December 3rd, and 
there were many good items on the programme. Plaunt had a good 
deal to say about that great Canadian metropolis, Hamilton. He 
told us what a fine chap the Hamilton police force was, and what 

35 



36 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

the main street looked like. "Pup" Murchison rendered several 
classical selections on the piano, and received a salvo of applause, 
while Richardson, as critic, did his duty so well that he was obliged 
to run another cross country. 

The next meeting was most successful, although it consisted 
chiefly of readings. Tom Aspden gave a very exceptional reading 
on "Education Made Easy" ; its chief characteristic was its length, 
and even Tom was tired when he had finished. 

Friday, January 24th, saw a large turnout for the first meeting 
of the Easter term. Proudfoot opened hostilities with some gym- 
nastics on the piano, but the big event of the evening was the 
debate; MacKenzie and Earle I. versus Chalker and Knechtel on 
"Are Movies an Evil or a Good to the Community?" MacKenzie 
told us how fine it was for the labouring classes to see great dra- 
matic actors such as Ben Turpin and Harold Lloyd, at such low 
prices as the movies charged. The negative, however, won the 
judges' decision, more on their eloquence than the soundness of 
their argument. We also had some music from Giffin on the cor- 
net and Hunter on the saxaphone. It was a great fight, but Hunter 
won on superior condition. 

The next meeting was held on the following Friday, and many 
exceptional speeches were given. Beatty gave a short speech 
which made Stephen Leacock look like two cents as a humourist. 
It was not so much what he said, but the way he said it. We also 
had some excellent views of Edinburgh on the magic lantern, ac- 
companied by short explanatory remarks from Dr. Macdonald. 

FlNDLEY II. 



THE LOWER SCHOOL LIT. 

The Lower School Lit has always been heralded with great ex- 
pectations by the lordly gentlemen of the Upper School, and this 
year it was no exception. Although mighty in many things these 
Upper School gentlemen are not in it with the genii of the Lower 
School when it comes to making Friday evening a success. 

For three days before the great event rumours, speculations and 
excitement ran high. One rumour to the effect that there were to 
be moving pictures grew till, in the end, the inmates of the Upper 
School were satisfied that on Friday night they were going to see a 
regular two-reel Mack Sennet comedy. This rumour, may it be 
mentioned, w r as responsible for the majority of those present. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 37 

At the appointed hour the Assembly Hall was the scene of 
many expectant faces. In a silence, broken only by the noise of a 
pin which some careless person dropped, the first marvel, in the 
person of Young, seated himself at the piano and ran through a 
piece which was heartily applauded by his hearers. There being 
no encores permitted, Horsfall now took the floor and gave a very 
good reading, the main purpose of which seemed to be to contradict 
itself whenever and wherever possible. After a recitation by 
Ruddy, Craig, an old standby of the Lower School, having success- 
fully completed his second lesson in music, rendered an intricate 
selection from Beethoven which required the use of as many as 
three fingers at one time. 

At this stage of the programme Giffin, much to the surprise of 
all who were under the impression that he had graduated from the 
Lower School, began playing the "Love Nest" or something. He 
was fairly well under way when from behind the piano there 
emerged a charming young lady who danced and sang in such a 
way that she captivated her whole audience. Several fellows could 
scarcely believe their eyes when told that the beautiful lady was no 
lady but Master Fitz Randolph Crowe, dressed up in borrowed gar- 
ments. Undoubtedly this was the feature of the evening, and the 
manner in which Crowe impersonated the members of the fair sex 
deserves great praise. He had all their arts and graces to perfec- 
tion and, experienced though they are, those in the audience could 
not detect in him anything which might betray the fact that he 
was a boy. The applause from Crowe's performance having sub- 
sided, Murchison III. gave an interesting talk about his home town, 
Buenos Aires; this was followed by a patriotic recitation on the 
"Flag" by Fraser I. McCord on the piano was one of the best 
numbers of the evening, playing in such a way as to rival many an 
older fellow, while Smiley's speech on "Camping" was received in 
an uproarious manner, especial^ when he said that he was drowned 
last summer when canoeing, and then adding, as an after thought, 
"but I was pulled out." A reading, violin solo, and piano solo by 
Sprott II., Bethune II. and Ellsworth, respectively, received their 
due amount of applause, and then there followed something of a 
novelty in the form of a mouth-organ duet by Parker and Noriega 
II. ; this developed into a solo about half-way through, as the hilari- 
ous state of mind in which Noriega found himself interfered some- 
what with his playing. He recovered later, however, and was able 
to successfully complete his part, though interrupted once or twice 
by giggles with which he seemed to have an overabundant supply. 



38 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

After another performance by Crowe, Sprott I. gave a speech on 
"Detention," in which he dealt with the sorrows of unfortunate 
detention workers. 

The programme was concluded by the motion pictures which 
everybody had looked forward to with such interest, and though, 
not as rumours had it, a Mack Sennet production, they were just as 
good and were received with great appreciation. Having an Allen 
in the college is a great convenience, as movies are then supplied 
without the necessary digging down into pockets which is so ter- 
rible a strain on the school-boy who prefers his money to be spent 
on something that can be eaten. 

Taking it all around the Lower School Lit. supplied more real 
enjoyment in their one night than the L'pper School has since the 
season opened. The admirable way in which each part was car- 
ried out speaks well for the careful training the boys had received 
at the hands of Mr. Palmer, and it is hoped that some time in the 
near future the Literary Society will be treated to another visit 
from the Lower School. J. H. Supple. 



THE CADET CORPS DANCE. 

One of the many events which we have been able to hold as in 
past years is the Cadet Corps Dance. Flags and bunting made the 
Assembly Hall most attractive, while rugs and palms decorated the 
platform where the orchestra was seated. Due to the enthusiastic 
direction of Mrs. Macdonald and a score of helpers, several rooms 
were arranged in a manner most inviting to those sitting out. Large 
Union Jacks were draped about the old familiar stairway, and the 
halls presented a gay appearance. Oriental rugs, clusters of soft- 
upholstered easy chairs, with plants and candles adorning the man- 
tlepiece, and a blazing fire completed the inviting aspect of the 
library. 

February third was the evening set apart for this, one of the 
biggest events of the school year. The stores were daily the scene 
of anxious searches for the "pick" of uniforms, and after hours 
spent in polishing buttons, the corps was pronounced ready for its 
"at home." 

At eight o'clock the guests began to arrive, and by nine the halls 
and Assembly Room were well crowded by the four hundred pres- 
ent. The floor was ideal, and a splendid orchestra of six rendered 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 39 

music which was most inducive to dancing. During an intermis- 
sion after the twelfth number a few extras were given by some old 
boys, Frank Somers at the piano, and Bob Dingman at the traps, as 
of yore. 

During the supper dances the dining room was filled with cou- 
ples partaking of the delicious refreshments. This year, instead 
of an outside caterer arranging the tables, the college steward did 
so, and in a manner most commendable. 

The party continued merrily until after midnight, and judging 
by the enthusiasm shown there was real regret when the last num- 
ber was played at one-thirty. God Save the King and a lusty 
"Hoot" concluded an evening which none will deny was perfect in 
every detail. Dayment. 



THE MINSTREL SHOW. 



Our second annual minstrel show was held in the college As- 
sembly Hall on Friday, February 25th. This was one of our regu- 
lar Literary Society meetings, but owing to considerable expense 
being incurred in the preparation of the show it was deemed ad- 
visable to sell tickets in order to defray the cost of production. 
When the curtains were thrown back at 8.15, a hall crowded to 
capacity greeted the merry-makers on the stage, and from the 
manner in which the opening number was received one knew that 
the minstrels had scored another success. In the first act the 
chorus appeared clad in red jackets and black trousers; perched 
jauntily on their heads were red and white "pill box" caps. The 
end-men were garbed in a manner suitable to their dignified roles 
with dress coats and white trousers, some of a near-fit and others 
voluminous. After the opening chorus, Huff rendered "The Moon 
Shines on the Moonshine," and when encored did a little eccentric 
dancing, which was very well received. "The Laughing Vamp," by 
the entire company, was one of the best numbers on the pro- 
gramme. This was followed by a solo from Grayson, "Grieving for 
you." Rastus and Heliotrope, impersonated by Huff and Daly, now 
gave some local hits, many of the boys and most of the master 
thereby suffering somewhat. "Left All Alone Again Blues" was 
sung by Wilson in a manner worthy of Al. Jolson. The first act 
ended with the entire company, accompanied by the college orches- 
tra, singing "Margie." One of the features of this act was a speech 



40 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 




ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 41 

by Daly. He gave a very finished performance, and brougth forth 
many a hearty laugh. 

During the intermission the orchestra played two selections 
and Randolph Crowe, the famous female impersonator, entertained 
the audience with songs and dances. The second act, with the 
company in an entire change of costume, opened with the singing 
of "Somebody." Daly's interpretation of "I Know Where the 
Flies Go" scored a big hit. This was followed by "Carry Me Back 
to Old Verginny," by the Three-in-One Trio. Huff now rendered 
another song and then the end men gave that ever popular num- 
ber, "Coon, Coon, Coon." This song, rendered in a novel manner, 
received a great ovation. "Down the Trail to Home Sweet Home," 
sung by Grayson in a clear tenor voice, brought tears to the eyes 
of many. A well balanced programme was closed with the entire 
company singing with great zip and abandon, "Cuba." After the 
National Anthem the guests of the school adjourned to the dining 
room where light refreshments were served. 

Mention must be made of the good work done by Sission I. and 
CroWther as stage managers, also that of Chalker, the master elec- 
trician, who was ably assisted in handling the spot-light by Supple. 
The cast of characters was as follows : 

Interlocutor Cameron II. 

End Men. 

Rastus Huff 

Heliotrope Daly 

Sambo Wilson I. 

George Washington Short Grayson 

Chorus. 
Peene, Glenn, Armstrong, Ellis I., Patterson III., Tyrer, Findley 

II., MacKenzie I. 
Musical Director Giffen 



THE CADET CORPS. 



Sir Henry Burstall, the Inspector-General of Codet Corps of 
Canada, is to visit Toronto in March, and the principal corps of the 
city are to parade. As this is an early date for a Cadet Corps 
inspection, we have had to arrange more drills. During the win- 
ter term there has been a prolonged noon hour in which period we 
have had pipe and bugle band practice, as well as rifle drill. The 



42 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



result has been that the corps is in splendid condition, and expects 
to present a trim appearance at the Armouries. Upper Canada, 
De La Salle, Appleby, and several other corps will be represented, 
but we are confident that the traditions associated with the kilts 
will in no wise be endangered. 



BASKETBALL. 

The basketball team this term is not as great a success as it 
was last year, owing to the fact that nearly all our basketball play- 
ers are hockey enthusiasts, and so far this year, although we have 
had a few practices, no team has been chosen, or any games ar- 
ranged. 

It is to be hoped before the ground drys out, and we prepare for 
summer sports, that the team may get under way, and meet with 
the success we have always had in this game. - 




HOCKEY A LA MEXICO. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



43 




FINDLAY III— CAPTAIN, FIRST HOCKEY TEAM, 1920-192 1. 



OCKEV, 




To most St. Andrew's boys the hockey season this year has 
been rather disappointing. The junior teams have been badly 
handicapped by lack of ice, while our senior team failed to come 
up to our expectations. Cameron's illness, and subsequent retire- 
ment from the game, proved a sad blow to the team, for it was 
not until near the close of the season that we were able to dis- 
cover, in his younger brother, a reliable goalkeeper. The team, 
however, did at times play remarkably good hockey, and we can 
console ourselves for numerous defeats by looking forward to next 
year when we expect to have most of the members of this season's 
team back on the job as well as plenty of good material from our 
very strong second team. 

We Rave had very little ice on the school rinks during the past 
two months, but, whenever skating was possible, the younger 
boys did not delay in arranging matches and accounts of several 
of the more important of these games, as well as all those played 
by the first and second teams, can be found on the following pages. 

PERSONNEL OF FIRST HOCKEY TEAM. 

Cameron II. — "Joe," weight 127 lbs. Goal. Plays the same 
cool, steady game as his brother Jack. First year on the team, and 
with a little more experience should develop into one of the best 
net guardians that ever represented St. Andrew's. 

Draper — "Harvey," weight 161 lbs. Left Defense. Uses his 
weight to good advantage, and always plays a clean, hard game. 
This is the first season he has worn St. Andrews' colours. 

44 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 45 

Peene — "Dave," weight 152 lbs. Right Defense. Showed great 
improvement as the season advanced. Not a good puck carrier, 
but played a strong defensive game. 

MacLeod — "Chuck," weight 145 lbs. Left Wing. An old col- 
our. A fast, aggressive player and a fair shot. At times some- 
what erratic in his play and inclined to wander from his position. 

Drury — "Bob," weight 145 lbs. Right Wing. First year on 
the team. A left-hand shot, and thus at a decided disadvantage 
in playing the Right Wing position. A good stick handler and 
checks back well. Should be a valuable man next year. 

Findlay III. — "Bruce," weight 124 lbs. Centre. Captained the 
team. A splendid stick-handler and skater. Worked in well on all 
combination plays, but is a little weak in shooting. 

Richardson — "Jimmie," weight 146 lbs. Substitute. A good, 
useful player. A hard worker, but a little weak in stick-handling. 

MacLaren II. — "Gord," weight 128 lbs. Showed great improve- 
ment toward the end of the season. Will be a useful forward next 
year. 

Sissons I. and Patterson III. managed the team very efficiently, 
while Smith I. looked after the handling of the tickets for the 
games and conducted any business which the team had to transact 
with the rink management. 



U. C. C. vs. S. A. C. 

On Friday, January 14, St. Andrew's met Upper Canada at the 
Arena. The teams lined up as follows: 

U.-C.C. S.A.C. 

Home .. '..Goal Gordon 

Mulqueen Defence Carrick I. 

Granger Defence Draper 

Wright Right Wing Drury I. 

Greey Left Wing MacLeod 

Reinhart Centre Findlay III. 

Lamport Sub Stonehouse 

Slaght Sub Peene 

Period 1. 

U. C. C. led off and bombarded S. A. C. goal for several minutes, 
but Draper took puck back in a long rush, but his shot failed to 



46 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

materialize. Play went from end to end, and it was only Carrick's 
checking w T hich broke up U. C. C. combination. MacLeod secured 
the puck and carried it through the defense and scored — U. C. C. ; 
S. A. C. 1. S. A. C. carried puck repeatedly into U. C. C. territory, 
but shooting failed. MacLeod played brilliantly at this time both 
in checking and rushing. U. C. C. carried puck past our defense 
and Greey beat Gordon for U. C. C.'s first tally. S. A. C. 1 ; U. C. C. 
1. Play was fast and furious till end of period, both sides playing 
fine hockey Period ended S. A. C. 1 ; U. C. C. 1. 

Period 2. 

U. C. C. carried puck to S. A. C.'s end, but Drury, outskating 
their forwards, passed the defense and scored, U.C.C. 1 ; S.A.C. 2. 
Play became rough and Drury and Greey were sent off for a sojourn 
on the boards. Drury got away, but failed in scoring. Greey took 
the puck and carried it through for U. C. C.'s last tally. U. C. C. 2 ; 
S. A. C. 2. 

Gordon played a good game in the nets, keeping out some wicked 
shots. Period ended, S. A. C. 2 ; U. C. C. 2. 

Period 3. 

Both teams were tired and irritable, and S. A. C. had the edge 
throughout, though they failed in scoring. Drury outskated every- 
body on the ice, and Findlay at centre played a fine game. Both 
teams seemed determined to win, but both defenses had tightened 
up, and the period was scoreless. S. A. C. 2 ; U. C. C. 2. 

Overtime Period. 

Play went all to U. C. C. end and Home saved wonderfully, but 
after a nice rush, Carrick passed to Findlay who scored. S. A. C. 
3 ; U. C. C. 2. S. A. C. kept up the good work and the game ended, 
S A. C. 3; U. C. C. 2. 

On the whole the game was a good exhibition of hockey, but in- 
dividual play was more noticeable than good combination. 



S. A. C. vs. U. T. S. 

On January 17 the team met U. T. S. at the Arena. Prior to 
the game Bruce Findlay was elected captain, an appointment which 
was well merited. The teams lined up as follows : 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 47 

U.T.S. S.A.C. 

Gooch Goal Gordon 

Porter Defence Draper 

Munro Defence Carrick I. 

Mills Righ Wing t .. Drury I. 

MacMaster Left Wing MacLeod 

Plaxton Centre ' Findlay III. 

Mowrey Sub Stonehouse 

Hutchison _ Sub Peene 

Period 1. 

S. A. C. carried the puck immediately into U. T. S. territory, 
and after hardly a minute's play passed U. T. S. defense and tallied, 
S. A. C. 1; U. T. S. 0. Drury was put off, and in his absence U. 
T. S. carried puck to S. A C. end and Plaxton scored for U. T. S., 
evening up the score. S. A. C. 1 ; U. T. S. 1. Immediately after, in 
a mixup in front of goal, U. T. S. scored again U. T. S. 2 ; 
S. A. C. 1. Period ended, U. T. S. 2 ; S. A. C. 1. 

Period 2. 

S. A. C. carried the puck again into U. T. S. end and Carrick 
bulged the net on a pass from Findlay. U. T. S. 2 ; S. A. C. 2. 
U. T. S. carried the puck back into S. A. C. territory, but Gordon 
saved the day. Munro was sent off for a second time, and taking 
advantage of his absence, S. A. C. pounded their goal, but were 
unsuccessful. Carrick was put off and in their anxiety to score the 
forwards left Draper alone on the defense, U. T. S. took the puck 
and outskating our forward line passed Draper and scored. Period 
ended, U. T. S. 3;S. A. C. 2. 

Period 3. 

This was a most disastrous period and the whole team seemed 
to be up in the air, with the result U. T. S. shot in five goals, bring- 
ing the score, U. T. S. 8; S. A. C. 2. Undaunted, Findlay, Mac- 
Leod and Drury made some fine rushes, especially Findlay who 
was a team in himself. They checked every rush, and time and 
again Draper took the puck back into U. T. S. territory, but failed 
to score. MacLeod, however, passed the defense in a nice rush and 
tallied the last goal of the game. Game ended, U. T. S. 8 ; S. A. C. 3. 

The game was far tighter than the score would indicate, and 
this was the first time, and perhaps the last, that the team showed 



is ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

any inclination towards combination, later relying almost abso- 
lutely on the speed and stick handling of the forward line. Plaxton 
played a good game for U. T. S. 



S. A. C. vs. ST. MICHAEL'S. 

St. Andrew's first team met St. Michael's on January 21 at the 
Arena. The teams lined up as follows: 

S.M.C. S.A.C. 

James Goal Gordon 

Rooney Defence Carrick I. 

McCarney Defence Draper 

Gauthier Right Wing Drury I. 

Murphy Left Wing MacLeod 

Millan Centre Findlay III. 

Jones Sub. Peene 

Smith Sub. MacLaren I. 

First Period. 

Play began with St. Mike's on offensive, and their fine combina- 
tion plays kept Gordon always busy. The defense did fine work, 
and it was only Carrick and Draper's play which kept the first 
period scoreless. Findlay also played a nice game at centre. Mur- 
phy for S.M.C. played the best game, although he and all the 
rest of the team failed to rally during first period. 

Second Period. 

Play again began with S. M. C. on the offensive, but our for- 
wards had livened up, and MacLeod, Findlay and Drury played a 
very good game individually, but they played very little combina- 
tion, and the result was S. M. C. kept up a steady stream of shots 
from both wings. Murphy scored the first for S.M.C, and then two 
more went in in quick succession, S. M. C. 3 ; S. A. C. 0. Play rushed 
from end to end. Draper and Findlay played their best game at 
this time. Period ended, S. M. C. 3 ; S. A. C. 0. 

Third Period. 

S. M. C. started in with a rush, and Gauthier drove in two 
more before the defense closed down, S. M. C. 5 ; S. A. C. 0. Then 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 49 

our forwards started to work. MacLeod and Findlay repeatedly 
drove through the defense, and then in the last five minutes Drury, 
with a wicked shot from the wing, scored, S. M. C. 5 ; S. A. C. 1. 
Hardly was the puck faced off when Drury went through and scored 
again. S. M. C. 5 ; S. A. C. 2. Scarcely was goal tallied when the 
bell rang. 

St. Mikes showed far superior combination to our team, but 
their checking was not so good as that of our forwards. It was in 
this game that the Carrick-Draper defense did so well, and Car- 
rick's rushes were the best on the team. 



S. A. C. vs. ST. MICHAEL'S. 



St. Andrew's met S. M. C. at the Arena for the second time, 
and as St. Mike's were winners in the group, we did very well to 
hold them to a one nothing score. The lion's share of the good 
stand we made is due almost entirely to Cameron and Carrick, both 
playing in brilliant form : The line-up : 

S. A. C. St. Mike's. 

Cameron II Goal James 

Draper Defence Rooney 

Carrick I _ Defence McCarney 

Findlay II Centre Gauthier 

Drury Left Wing Murphy 

MacLeod Right Wing Millan 

MacLaren Sub Jones 

Peene Sub Smith 

Period 1. 
St. Mike's carried the puck into S. A. C. territory, but Carrick 
broke their combination and rushing through their defense, shot, 
but failed to score. St. Mike's carried it back, and bombarded 
Cameron freely, but Joe showed some of Jack's style and success- 
fully kept them out. MacLeod and Drury made a fine combination 
play, but again a score failed to materialize. The S. M. C. for- 
wards rushed up again and again, but Findlay did some good back 
checking, and S. M. C. went scoreless. 

Period 2. 
S. A. C. started the period well by carrying the puck into S. 
M. C. territory, but in rushing gack one of the St. Mike's defense, 



50 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Rooney, tried to hurdle Carrick, and Carrick inadvertently 
raised himself, and the man was laid out. After a few minutes he 
proceeded gamely to play, but his game was not as good as it had 
been. Carrick was not to be blamed for this action, as it was 
entirely unintentional. In the end of the period this man tried the 
same trick, and very nearly met the same fate. The play became 
quite rough at this point, and it was owing to the good work of 
Draper and Drury that S. M. C. went scoreless, and, later, when 
MacLeod was the only forward on the ice, he played splendidly. 
The period ended scoreless. 

Period 3. 

S. M. C. started off with a punch, and one of their men was 
sent to the penalty box. Both teams were tired, and as a result, 
the play was ragged, and penalties were very frequent. MacLeod, 
Findlay and Drury were undoubtedly the best. ■ Both sides were 
trusting to luck, and several times on a face-off scoring was averted 
by a hair's breadth, and on several of MacLeod's wing shots the 
goalkeeper saved more by good luck than good management. Find- 
lay starred all through the forward play, rushing repeatedly 
through the defense. S. A. C. had undoubtedly the edge on the 
period. 

Overtime. 

Both teams came on the ice fresh, and after three minutes' play 
S. M. C. scored on a vicious shot from right wing, which passed 
Cameron. Findlay took the puck into the defense time and time 
again, but failed to score. S. A. C. ; S. M. C. 1. 

This was undoubtedly the best game we had in the season, and 
the team deserves to be heartily congratulated on its game, especi- 
ally Cameron, who showed up splendidly. 



S. A. C. vs. U. C. C. 

S. A. C. U. C. C. 

Cameron Goal Home 

Draper Defense Lamport 

Carrick Defense Mulqueen 

Findlay Centre Reinhart 

MacLeod Left Wing Greey 

Drury Right Wing Wright 

Richardson Subs Skaith 

MacLaren Sub's Slaght 



st. andrew's college review 51 

Period 1. 
U. C. C. took the puck at once into S. A. C. end, evading our 
defense, but Reinhart's shot failed to score. Draper carried the puck 
back, but U.C.C. had a wonderful back-check, and soon the puck was 
back in S. A. C. end. Drury, MacLeod and Findlay tried to rush 
it out, but failed, and in the melee which followed U. C. C. scored 
a very doubtful goal. U. C. C. 1 ; S. A. C. 0. Again both teams 
started off at terrific speed and S. A. C. bombarded U C. C. goal 
frequently, when U. C. C. forwards took the puck and outskating 
our forward line were driven into a corner by the defense, but on 
the rebound Reinhart scored. S. A. C. 0; U. C. C. 2. Play was 
much in U. C. C.'s favour when MacLeod secured the puck and 
scored on one of his wicked wing shots. S. A. C. 1 ; U. C. C. 2. 

Period 2. 
U. C. C. started again, using the same tactics, going down and 
bouncing the puck off the boards to the eveready Reinhart, but he 
had found in Findlay a very able opponent, who broke up their 
rebound system, usually running the puck back again into U, C. C. 
end, but Lamport and Mulqueen were an admirable defense, and 
Mulqueen's rushes were only broken up when he encountered Car- 
rick. The U. C. C. forwards ran the puck back into S. A. C. end 
and scored. S. A. C. 1 ; U. C. C. 3. U. C. C. took the puck back 
again, but Drury broke up the play, carried the puck back, very 
nearly scoring. S. A. C. then bombarded Home freely, but failed 
to score. Period ended 3-1. 

Period 3. 

S. A. C. started well, but play was very ragged, and the com- 
bination was poor. Findlay, Drury and MacLeod worked hard, 
but their rushes were usually broken up by U. C. C. back-checking. 
Cameron saved a large number of hard shots. Draper rushed, but 
Mulqueen checking him carried the puck down, and in a mixup in 
front of goal U. C. C. scored again. U. C. C. 4 ; S. A. C. 1. 

After this it was all S. A. C. Findlay bombarded the goal from 
every angle, and Drury passed the defense several times, but failed 
in scoring. Reinhart, Greey and Wright were checked every time 
they started, but S. A. C. did not score, and the game ended. S. A. 
C. 1; U. C. C. 4. 

Carrick and Draper played an excellent defensive game, while 
Cameron in goal performed like a veteran. Findlay was best on 
the forward line. 

For U. C. C. Reinhart and Skaith were by far the best. 



52 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

S. A. C. vs. U. T. S. 

Our last O. H. A. game was played against U. T. S. on Feb. 
3rd. The line-up of the two teams was the same as on their previ- 
ous engagement, except that Peene replaced Carrick I. on the St. 
Andrew's defense. 

There is little to relate about the game. The minds of the S. 
A. C. boys must have been on the College dance, which was to be 
held that evening. Judging by their play they were thinking of 
anything but hockey. U. T. S. won by a wide margin. Their team 
showed a marked improvement as the season advanced, and they 
well deserved to win second place in the group. 



S. A. C. vs. T. C. S. 



On Saturday, February 12th, St. Andrew's journeyed to Port 
Hope to meet the Trinity College School First Hockey Team. For- 
tunately, there had been a heavy frost the previous night so an 
excellent sheet of ice was provided for the game. The game was 
called for 1.45 to enable the St. Andrew's team to catch the 4.05 
train for Toronto. The teams lined up as follows: 

S. A. C. T. C..S. 

Cameron II Goal Doupe 

Draper : Defense Cruickshank 

Peene Defence Turner II. 

Findlay III. Centre Merrill (Capt.) 

Drury Right Wing Mulholland 

MacLeod Left Wing Cameron 

McLaren Subs McPherson 

Richardson Subs Johnston I. 

First Period. 

T. C. S. rushed St. Andrew's goal from the face-off, but shot 
wildly. Findlay was forced to retire for a few minutes, having re- 
ceived accidentally a blow from an opponent's stick. McLaren re- 
placed him and very nearly scored for St. Andrew's. After about 
five minutes' play Drury evaded the T. C. S. defense and drove a 
shot past Doupe for the first tally of the game. Play became rag- 
ged, neither team attempting any combination, while considerable 
slashing was indulged in. Mulholland drew a penalty for tripping 
Findlay and the latter followed him to the penalty box a moment 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 53 

later for a similar offence. Before the period ended T. C. S. tied 
the score, Merrill (bulging the net on a lucky shot from a face-off 
in front of S. A. C. goal. Good hockey was not in evidence during 
this period, the play resembling very much that old-fashioned 
game of shinney. St. Andrew's found it difficult to get going on 
the small ice surface, while T. C. S., judging from the remarks 
made by their supporters, were not playing up to their true form. 

Second Period. 

Early in the period Draper made a nice rush and centred to 
Findlay, who batted the puck past the T. C. S. goalie. Cameron 
saved nicely for St. Andrew's on several occasions, but was not 
kept as busy as the T. C. S. goal-keeper. St. Andrew's should have 
scored several times during this period, but weak and wild shoot- 
ing, coupled with some good stops by Doupe, kept the score down. 
Drury and Findlay played good hockey in this period, but there was 
still a great lack of team-play by both sides. 

During this period an amusing incident took place, a football 
fell from one of the rafters of the rink. MacLeod attempted to 
kick it over the wire netting which surrounds the ice surface. Of 
course, MacLeod is a scrimmage man, and never pretended to be 
an expert punter, so when he went to kick the ball — well, you'd 
better ask "Mac" about it! Anyway, it provided considerable 
amusement for the T. C. S. boys who were watching the game. 
Harve Draper came to MacLeod's rescue, and when his toe hit the 
old pig-skin it soareaHback again into the rafters and the game pro- 
ceeded. The period ended with St. Andrew's leading by a score of 
2 to 1. 

Third Period. 

Things began to happen in the final period. The T. C. S. boys 
opened up a terrific bombardment on the S. A. C. goal and gave 
Cameron a busy few minutes. Play became faster and T. C. S. 
altered their tactics, checking St. Andrew's right at their own goal 
instead of falling back to centre. Penalties were handed out fre- 
quently to both teams. On a mix-up in front of the St. Andrew's 
net T. C. S. scored the tieing goal. This goal was disputed, but 
was allowed by Referee Grant. A few minutes later T. C. S. took 
the lead, scoring on a pretty combination play, Merrill being re- 
sponsible for the shot that beat Cameron. Drury evaded the T. 
C. S. defense, but failed to score. On a face-off in front of T. C. S. 



54 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

goal, Findlay scored the final counter of the game, making the score 
three alL In this period T. C. S. had the better of the play, but 
tired badly in the last five minutes. It had been agreed by both 
teams that in the event of a tie no overtime would be played. 

Barring the first ten minutes of the final period the game was 
a poor exhibition of hockey. For T. C. S. Turner played a strong 
game, rushing and shooting well, while "Runt" Cameron, at left 
wing, put up a plucky fight until forced to retire towards the end of 
the last period. Findlay, Draper and Drury showed up well for 
St. Andrew's. "Tod" Grant handled the game in a most satisfac- 
tory manner. 



T. C. S. vs. S. A. C. 

On Saturday, February 26th, we played the return game with 
T. C. S. at the Arena. The line-up was as follows: 

T. C. S. S. A. C. 

Doupe Goal Cameron II. 

Osier II. Defense Draper 

Turner II Defense Peene 

Merrill Centre Findlay III. 

Mulholland ...Left Wing MacLeod 

Cruikshank Right Wing Drury 

Cameron Subs : MacLaren 

Macpherson Subs Richardson 

Jones I Spare Goal 

Period One. 

T. C. S. took puck immediately after face-off and in a flash of 
brilliant combination Merrill shot the puck past Cameron — T. C. S. 
1; S. A. C. 0. MacLeod rushed the puck through the defense, 
but Doupe made a nice save of what seemed a certain goal. It was 
here that the T. C. S. forwards showed their undisputed superiority 
in both speed and combination by rushing the puck back to our end, 
but Peene showed some good checking and saved the day. T. C. S. 
rushed the puck back and Mulholland scored. T. C. S. 2 ; S. A. C. 0. 
The Trinity forward line now bombarded Cameron quite freely, but 
"Joe" played a good game until Cruikshanks passed Peene and 
scored on another shot from the wing. T. C. S. 3 ; S. A. C. 0. 



st. andrew's college review" 55 

Period Two. 
T. C. S. used itheir combination again to get S .A. C. end and 
Mulholland drove a wicked wing shot at Cameron, who saved. 
Draper rushed puck back, passed to Findlay, who failed to score. 
Trinity took play back to our end and on a fine shot Mulholland 
again beat Cameron. T. C. S. 4 ; S. A. C. 0. Our forwards then 
kept the play in T. C. S end, but failed in scoring. T. C. S. 4; 
S. A. C. 0. 

Period Three. 
Findlay took puck into T. C. S. territory, but using their won- 
derful combination Trinity took the puck back, and Mulholland 
scored again. The puck was faced-off and the same man rushed 
past Draper and scored. T. C. S. 6 ; S. A. C. 0. Play went from 
end to end, and in a mixup in front of goal, Mulholland scored 
again. T. C. S. 7 ; S. A. C. 0. Draper took puck back and passed 
to Findlay who scored. T. C. S. 7 ; S. A. C. 1. S. A. C. then left 
the defense and shot continually, but Doupe was good and they 
failed to score. Turner took the puck on the rebound off Draper's 
shot, rushed down and scored. T. C. S. 8 ; S. A. C. 1. This was the 
last tally, and Trinity won the game on their superior speed and 
combination. It was a clean exhibition of hockey, not a single pen- 
alty being imposed on either side. 



U. C. C. II. vs. S. A. C. II. 

On Saturday, Feb. 19th, at the Arena, S. A. C. II. met U. C. C. 
II. The game was a success from two points of view. It was a 
victory, and it also unearthed some admirable material for next 
year. The line-up : 

S.A.C. II. U.C.C. II. 

Skeaff Centre Meech 

Lyon Right Wing Dean 

Findlay II Left Wing Martin 

King Defense Hargraft 

Carrick II Defense Branton 

Lewis Goal Tamplet 

Earle II Subs. , McCray 

Hambly Subs King 

White- 
Referee — Trotter. 



56 st. andrew's college review 

Period 1. 

Play centred around S. A. C. end, but owing to Findlay's and 
Carrick's checking U. C. C. did not score. King rushed the puck 
to U. C. C. end, but did not succeed in passing the defense. Har- 
graft rushed back and in a mixup the puck was batted in past Lewis 
by Grant. U. C. C. 1 ; S. A. C. 0. King rushed the puck into U. 
C. C. territory, but failed in scoring. Lyon shot from wing, but 
Tamplet saved, however, Hambly scored on the rebound S. A. C. 
1 ; U. C. C. 1. Meech shortly after passed our defense and scored, 
(J. C. C. 2 ; S. A. C. 1. King by some nice stick-handling worked 
his way through and very nearly scored. Period ended, S. A. C. 1 ; 
U. C. C .2, 

King was elected captain at the end of this period. The choice 
was a good one, as King has had plenty of experience. 

Period 2. 

S. A. C. rushed puck into U. C. C. end, and Skeaff scored on a 
pass from King. U. C. C. 2 ; S. A. C. 2 Skeaff took puck and rush- 
ing past the defense scored again. S. A. C. 3 ; U. C. C. 2. U. C. C. 
rushed into our end, but Carrick showed some of his brother's 
style and broke up the attack. Skeaff ran the puck back and scored 
again. S. A. C. 4; U. C. C. 2. Lewis, after this, made some fine 
saves and cleared well. Findlay rushed and passed to Skeaff who 
failed to score. U. C. C." rushed puck back into our end, but Skeaff 
took it back, passed to Hambly, who scored. S. A. C. 5 ; U. C. C. 2. 
U. C. C. then kept puck in our end, but owing to Lyon, Carrick and 
Lewis they failed in scoring. Game ended. S. A. C. 5 ; U. C. C. 2. 

Skeaff and Lewis were best for the winners, while Meech 
showed up well for the losers. 

R. H. Anderson. 



HOUSE AND FORM MATCHES. 

ROOM 105 vs. THE REST OF THE LOWER FLAT. 
On Tuesday, February 1st, the boys of Room 105 met and de- 
feated by a score of 3 to a team composed of the hockey stars 
from all the other rooms on the flat. Smart combination play by 
the lads of 105 proved too much for their opponents and the result 
of the match was never in doubt. For the winners Birkett checked 
and rushed well while Cameron III.'s shooting was particularly 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 57 

effective. Munn I. was best for the losers. The winning team 
lined-up as follows: 

Room 105 — Goal. Reid; Defense, Robertson II., and Crosbie II.; 
Centre, Birkett; Right Wing, Grant; Left Wing, Cameron III. 

ROOM 105 vs. ROOM 215. 

The next House match was played on Saturday, February 5th. 
This was a very keenly contested game, and the boys of 105 had to 
extend themselves to win by a score of 2 to 1. Only five men a side 
were played, owing to Robertson II. being incapacitated. The com- 
bination work of the boys from the lower flat was responsible for 
their finishing with the bigger end of the score. In Reid, Birkett 
and Cameron III. the school has three forwards that will bear 
watching during the next few seasons. For the losers Taggart and 
Cameron II. played well. The teams lined up as follows : 

Room 105 — Goal, Crosbie; defense, Grant I.; centre, Birkett; 
wings, Cameron III., and Reid. 

Room 215 — Goal, Cochrane; defense, Palmer; centre, Patterson 
III. ; Wings, Cameron II. and Taggart. 

FORM IIIA vs. FORM IIIB. 

A fast and spectacular game of hockey was played on Monday, 
Feb. 21st, when the IIIA "Midgets" met the "Small Fry" of IIIB. 
Only two twenty minute periods were played and at half time IIIB 
was leading by a score of 1 to 0, but early in the second period 
Whilans drove a wicked shot past Horsfall, making the score a tie. 
Play now became fast and furious. Eddie Noonan was benched for 
slashing and a moment later McLennan II. drew a major penalty 
for throwing his stick. Both teams scored in quick succession, and 
jt began to look as though overtime would have to be played in 
order to declare a winner, but with one minute to play Waldo Hol- 
den carried the puck through the entire IIIA team and scored the 
winning goal. 

For the winners, Noonan and Holden played fine hockey, while 
Whilans, Chalmers and McLennan II. starred for IIIA. The teams 
lined up as follows: 

IIIB — Goal, Horsfall; defense, Holden; centre, Duffus; wings, 
McDonald and Noonan. 

IIIA — Goal, Gallagher; defense, Whilans; centre, Chalmers; 
wings, Brown I. and McLennan II. 



Our Old Boys 



OLD BOYS' NEWS 

We publish below a photograph which should interest most of 
our old boys. "Doug." Fraser was the first boy enrolled at St. 
Andrew's College. Here he is with his two sons, Bob and Phil, 
both attending the college this year. We have now three boys of 




"DOUG." FRASER AND HIS TWO SONS — ALL LOYAL ANDREANS. 

the second generation at the school. How many are we going to 
have next year? 

Jack Applegath and Alan Pringle, who left, the College at 
Christmas, are now with the National Trust Co. 

"Tod" "Grant returned from New York last October, and is now 

58 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 59 

holding an important position with the Smoot Service Corpora- 
tion of this city. "Tod" occasionally finds time to referee an O. 
H. A. match, and he continues to take a keen interest in any ath- 
letic event in which St. Andrew's is concerned. 

"Rufus" Syer may be found at the A. E. Ames & Co. between 
the hours of nine and five (sometimes later) ; after that he is 
usually at the College where he is performing the duties of a house 
master. 

B. W. Emerson is with Aemilius Jarvis & Co. 

Gordon Hewitt and Grant Stirrett represented Varsity in the 
Intercollegiate assault-at-arms. Hewitt successfully defended his 
title as Intercollegiate champion fencer, while Stirrett was entered 
in the heavy weight boxing. 

The many old Andreans at the dinner tendered the Varsity 
Rugby team gave Dr. Macdonald a very cordial reception when he 
rose to present the miniature Earl Grey cups to the members of 
the championship team. Four old boys, Stirrett, Taylor, Rolph and 
Earle were among those to receive these trophies. 

The school has recently received visits from Charlie Shaw of 
Huntsville, Gordon Spohn, Russell Carr and Stanley Gordon, also 
during the past term quite a number of old boys have attended 
Sunday evening chapel service on various occasions. 

C. S. Lee is now studying law at Osgoode Hall. 

Joe McDougall, a former member of the Review staff, has been 
appointed literary editor of the Goblin, the new Varsity humorous 
magazine. 

' The attention of all Old Boys is directed to the fact that the 
annual meeting of the Old Boys' Association will take place at the 
school on Friday evening, April 1st, when the Old Boys will be the 
guests of the school at dinner at 7.00 o'clock. 

As the school is back in North Rosedale, it is expected that there 
will be a large turn-out of Old Boys. Notices will be sent out in 
due course, and in the meantime the Secretary of the Old Boys' 
Association asks all Old Boys to keep the date in mind. If the 
notice does not reach you, in any case, drop a line to the Secretary 
of the school expressing your intention of being present, so that a 
place will be reserved for you. 



OLD BOYS' DINNER AT WINNIPEG. 

On Thursday, December 9th, the annual meeting of the Win- 
nipeg Branch of the Old Boys' Association was held in the Fort 



ti() ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 

Garry Hotel, Winnipeg, when the Old Boys were the guests of the 
Headmaster at dinner. The following officers were elected: A. D. 
McRae, President; E. F. Stovel, Secretary. 

A very enjoyable evening was spent, the Association having as 
its guests, Colonel W. G. Bell, of Winnipeg, and Mr. J. G. Merrick, 
and Mr. Norton Crow, of Toronto. 

The Headmaster states that the pleasure of seeing the Old Boys 
again was ample compensation in itself for the time spent in the 
journey to Winnipeg to keep the appointment. 



BIRTHS. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Rudolf Copeland, on June 14th, 1920, 
a son (Jacques Rudolf Henry). 

To Mr.. and Mrs. David W. Booth, on June 20th, 1920, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Thompson, on June, 29th, 1920, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bicknell, on July 1st, 1920, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. A. D. McCurdy, on January 18th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Carlyle, on February 13th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David B. Carlyle, on February 18th, 1921, a 
daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lyman P. Howe, on October 22nd, 1920 a 
daughter. 



MARRIAGES. 

Harold S. Leckie, on October 22nd, 1919, to Miss Josephine 
Crombie, of Montreal. 

Dr. Lorne C. Montgomery, on June 9th, 1920, to Miss Evelyn 
Jackson. 

Robert McLeod Myers, on June 9th, 1920, to Miss Lamont, of 
Brandon. 

William Reginald Shaw, on June 9th, 1920, to Miss Lillian 
McBride. 

George F. Dimock, on June 10th, 1920, to Miss Douglas. 

Frederick V. Johnston, on June 16th, 1920, to Miss Jean 
Thorburn. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 61 

E. M. Smith, on June 23rd, 1920, to Miss Agnes McCrae. 

Edward Evans, on July 28th, 1920, to Miss Jeanie Shiras Mc- 
Lachlan, of Guelph, Ontario. 

Henry Gordon Spohn, on January 29th, 1921, to Miss Beatrice 
Donalda Coates, of Montreal. 

C. E. Kilmer, on February 12th, 1921, to Miss Isobel McCaus- 
land, of Toronto. 

W. B. McPherson, on October 14th, 1920, to Miss Flora 
Macdonald, of Toronto. 

Dr. Frank R. King, on October 26th, 1920, to Miss Jeffrey, 
of Winnipeg. 

E. F. Chestnut, on December 15th, 1920, to Miss Phyllis Louise 
Hewson, of Penetanguishene, Ontario. 



OBITUARY. 



Copping, Norman Judson, was born in Toronto on May 14th, 
1886. He came up to St. Andrew's College from McCaul Public 
School in September, 1901, and left in June, 1902, to enter business. 
For some years he was with his father in the firm of Geo. R. Cop- 
ping & Son. When his father was lost in the sinking of the Lusi- 
tania he took charge of the business, and was also engaged in manu- 
facturing. Some time ago he sold his manufacturing interests and 
confined his attention to the affairs of his company. 

On February 3rd, 1921, he succumbed to an attack of pneumonia 
after a few days' illness. 

Norman Copping had many friends, both at school and in later 
life, who will miss him very much. His old school joins with them 
in sympathetic regard for the widow and children who are left 
behind to mourn his passing. 

Horn, Hubert Lee, was born on November 26th, 1896. He 
come up to St. Andrew's College from Winnipeg in September, 
1913, and left in June, 1915. After matriculating into McGill Uni- 
versity in the autumn of the same year he entered upon his uni- 
versity course at Chicago. In 1918 he died in Kansas City. The 
news of his death reached the Review only a few weeks ago. 

While at St. Andrew's College Horn took an interest in all the 
school activities, and was on the Second Football Team. Many of 
his old school friends will learn with sorrow that his earthly course 
has been of such brief duration. 



62 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Brown, Henry Clifford, was born on May 26tb, 1900. He 
came to St. Andrew's College from Columbia High School in Sep- 
tember, 1917, and left in June, 1918, to attend the University of 
Missouri. 

In 1917 he played on the Second Football Team, and during 
the winter term filled the position of Historian in the Literary So- 
ciety. In October, 1918, he joined the Officers' Training Corps at 
Columbia, Missouri. 

During the summer vacation of 1920 he was working as a brake- 
man. In the course of his duty he got off his train at a dangerous 
switch and received serious injuries to which he succumbed five 
days later. 

. Clifford Brown was a very popular boy at school. His good 
nature, sense of humour and unfailing readiness to lend a helping 
hand made him very welcome wherever he went. Many of his old 
school mates will learn with great regret of the fatal accident 
which brought his earthly career to such a sudden close. 




SA n RDAY AFTERS 



" CAGED BIRD!- 




From a cupboard securely locked against eager and inquisitive 
hands the Exchange Editor now draws forth a vast supply of accu- 
mulated exchanges, and with an unbiased mind, he proceeds to offer 
praise or constructive criticism to each of these magazines. 

The first to present itself to his impartial eye is: 

Vox Lycie, of Hamilton Collegiate, an Athletic and Shooting 
Number. The cover is well drawn and brings honour to the Col- 
legiate. A few stories would help to liven the contents of the Vox, 
otherwise it is a fine magazine. 

The Managra, representing the Manitoba Agricultural College, 
has advertisements spread throughout, which we think detracts 
from the interest of the reading matter. 

This is the first time we have had the privilege of exchanging 
with the Copa De Ora, of Orland Union High School, and we hope 
to continue to do so in the future. The arrangement of your photo- 
graphs, and sketches, is splendid. 

Next is the College Times from a near-by friend, Upper Canada 
College. Lack of stories is noticeable in your well put together 
Times, and excellent style is shown in the manner in which the 
rugby games are written up. Your ads. show that the Times' 
business managers are not asleep. 

Then comes the King's College, Windsorian. It is a nearly con- 
structed journal. A few stories would increase its size, also make 
it more interesting to its readers. 

The Blue and White, of Rothsay Collegiate School, is much bet- 
ter than last issue, and we hope it continues to improve. 

It is from the Far West that our next exchange arrives. The 
Black and Red of the University Military School, B. C, is a very 
attractive book. We wish you success as a military school. 

We are glad to welcome the first issue of the Goblin. A publi- 
cation of this type is more than welcome, for it portrays the 
brighter side of Varsity life and brings smiles to all who read it. 
We hope you become one of our permanent exchanges. 

63 



64 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Here's a new one; the Central Hi Review. A paper in which 
the Exchange Editor takes an interest. 

Headings are needed and Table of Contents required in the Acta 
Ridleiana of Ridley College. Your literary matter is good. Per- 
haps you could increase the size, also the quality of your Acta 
Ridleiana by carrying some advertising. 

The St. Thomas Collegian has good cartoons; but why not ex- 
tend them through your Collegian? 

We are always glad to receive the Tallow Dip from Netherwood, 
Rothesay, N.B. Why not introduce a Table of Contents? 

A lively paper for its size is the Stratford Collegian. 

The literary work in the University of Alberta, Gateway 
Monthly, is always appreciated by us. We also wish to acknow- 
ledge the receipt of the Gateway Weekly. 

The Macdonald College Magazine, St. Annes, Que., suggests 
poor business management by having its cover put on upside down. 
The stories and other works are very interesting. 

Arriving from Carteret Academy, Orange, N.J., comes the Car- 
teret. It is plain, but attractive, and could be increased in volume. 

Improvement could be made in the Local Department of the 
Oakwood Oracle. Apart from this the Oracle does not disappoint 
us. 

The Ethical Culture High School, Inkling's literary products 
always interest us, and this magazine holds a high place in our 
lists. 

Welcome Lux Columbiana to our exchange list. 

The exchange section is well written in your Acadia Athenaeum. 
Your criticism is to the point. Need of photos is observable. Will 
the Exchange Editor of the Athanaeum please read the editorial 
in the last issue of the Review? 

The Blue and White of Port Hope High School has shown con- 
siderable growth in size. This goes to show what a small magazine 
can rise to if well supported. 

Quibs are especially prominent in the Chronicle of Niagara 
Falls School, N.Y., also the rest of its material is well written. 
We might suggest that a short story occasionally be put in this 
paper. 

The Ashburian requires stories, also pictures, to liven it up. 

The Appleby School, Argus: Your Old Boys' Section reveals 
the interest that your Old Boys take in you as well as in the Argus. 

We also have pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of the fol- 
lowing : 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



65 



The Lake Lodge Record : Lake Lodge School, Grimsby, Ont. 
The Crimson and White : Pottsville High School, Pottsville, Pa. 
The Review: Lowell High School, Lowell, Mass. 
The Record: Trinity College School, Port Hope, Ont. 

0. SlSSONS. 



\ 




■*1 T : W,i 



I 



i 




PRO OMNIBUS NOSTRIS BENEFICIIS. 

When the luncheon bell is ringing 
And we're in a famished mood, 

Then the school boy's fickle fancy 
Lightly turns to thoughts of food. 

In two ranks, for place competing, 

We line up against the wall, 
Waiting for the tardy master 

To conduct us to the Hall. 

For an hour we've been sniffing 
Odours that entice and please; 

Is it soup or macaroni? 
Can it be a piece of cheese ! 

Now the portals are thrown open, 

And we file into our place, 
Stand behind our chairs in silence 

While a prefect mumbles grace. 

Knives and forks are poised for action, 

Enter Lucy with a tray, 
And the maid, in great distraction, 

Sets it down and glides away. 

What is this I see before me 

With the texture of a stone? 
'Tis not sausage nor spaghetti, 

Is it liver and ba-cone? 

Do mine eager eyes deceive me, 

What is this the maid has brought? 

Is it apple, fig, banana, 
Or the wizened apricot! 

After all, what does it matter 
In the light of days to come, 

When we've left behind our platter 
And uncritical become? 
66 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



67 



When our boyhood days are over, 
We've amassed a mighty pile 

And are treating with our doctor 
For our tummies all the while. 

Then shall we look back with longing 
At our simple college fare, 

Wishing that we now could relish 
All the dainties we got there. 




The Roisterers. 



rfg" 




Huff: "Can you toddle, Bill?" 

Shaw : "Why, I could do it when I was a year old." 



Algy: "Lend me some brilliantine to shine my buttons with." 



Curry was out in Parkdale one Saturday evening, or rather 
Sunday morning (it was around one o'clock), and the young lady 
on whom he was calling became wearied. She said, "Stay another 
half-hour, Rufus, and go to church with me." 

Rufus was sorely smitten, but recovering replied: "Certainly, 
I'll gef the license and be ready in fifteen minutes." 



Pa's Friend: "I see your son is home for the holidays." 
Pa : "I thought I had a glimpse of him the other day." 



Barber (To Cook I.) : "Do you want your hair braided or 
bobbed?" 



There was a young student called Skeaff, 
Whose hours of study were brief, 

In the Christmas exams. 

He Fad many slams, 
But he's turned over now a new leaf. 



Mr. Goodman (dropping the quicksilver) : "Catch it, some one!' 
Smith : "It's too quick for me, sir." 

68 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW <39 

First Boy: "Is your sister a blonde?" 

Second Boy: "She was the last time I saw her." 



Fleck: "I wish that I could dance." 

Janitor: (with step-ladder): "Watch me, I'll show you some 
steps." 



My thoughts are ever flying 
Toward the beaming moon, 
While Betty-Jane was flirting, 
What was Lorna Doone? 



Master (at hockey game) : "What position is Findlay III. play- 
ing to-day?" 

New Boy : "I'm not sure, but I heard a lady say she thought he 
was an offence." 



Russell II. : "I'm going to give up washing during Lent." 
King: "Why don't you make a real sacrifice?" 



Bill Brunt (to room-mates) : "Fight fellows! Give them the 
dickens, then beat it. I've got a sore foot, so I'll beat it now." 



McLennan says : "Bingham is so crazy that he is afraid to go 
near any one with a squirrel coat." 



Motion Passed by Lower Sixth: Resolved, that if possible 
sufficient parking space be found for the feet of Messrs. Lumbers 
and Fisher other than the aisle which they are occupying at pres- 
ent. 



Russel I. : "Judge is greatly superior to Life." 
Patterson II. : "But you didn't see life until you came to Toronto, 
so how can you judge?" 



Master (in class-room H.) : "What is darkening the room?" 
Boy : "Fleck is out on the lawn, sir." 



Murchison I. : "See the dancing snow-flakes." 
Murchison II. : "Practicing for the snow-ball, I guess." 



70 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



Buckley: "I was over to Europe last summer." 

Everhart: "Were you a stoker or a bar-tender on the boat?" 



Mr. Findlay : "Give an example of alliteration." 

Findlay I. : "Bill Brunt Broncho Buster bites bad boys." 



Crosbie I. : "This floor is so slippery, it's hard to keep on your 
feet." 

Girl : "So you were trying to keep on my feet and I thought it 
was accidental." 



Mr. Laidlaw: "In what battle did General Wolle cry: 'I die 
happy'?" 

Blauvelt: "It must have been his last battle, sir." 



A CRYPTIC TALE. 

Fearful noise. It's the boys. 
Fall of plaster. Comes the Master. 
Some detention. Let me mention. 
Saturday. Not so gay. 



MacKay was going down Yonge Street when he saw an adver- 
tisement, "Have you a Fairy in your home?" He thought of his 
friend McLachlan, and said, "I'll say we have." 



A TRAGEDY 
(IN ONE ACT.) 

Scene: School corridor. 

Characters : Brunt and Armstrong. 

Scene I. 

Brunt: "Ho, varlet, where goest thou?" 

Armstrong: "To imbibe of nature's wine, the water that seep- 
eth from the fountain." 

Brunt': "See that the same liquid toucheth thy homely visage." 

Armstrong: "Hold thy peace, dog, ere I duck thee in the water." 

Brunt: "Water hath not touched me since I passed under the 
postern gate of Hanover." 

Struggle ensues in which Brunt is ducked. 

Brunt: "I am undone — I am clean! Clean! etc., etc. 

Curtain falls upon Brunt in the waste basket in heartbroken 
attitude with one foot in his mouth. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 71 

(Submitted by a list of victims too numerous to mention) : A 
large crowd in the infirmary surrounding Bingham, exclamations 
of, "Hurray, he's got his mouth closed at last" — Bingham is having 
his temperature taken. 



Mr. Goodman : "Oxygen is essential to all animal existence, 
there could be no life without it ; yet it was discovered but a half- 
century ago." 

Temple: "How did people live before they discovered it?" 



Mr. Laidlaw: "Do any of you boys know Cleopatra?" 
McLachlan: "Why, do you know her, I had a Christmas card 
from her." 



A RECITATION BY BLAUVELT. 
My Towel. 
"The laundry gets no cash from me, 
I cry in my merry glee; 
One towel I use throughout the term, 
True 'tis dirty, but never a germ 
Would dare to enter its poisonous folds 
For fear of the dirt this old rag holds." 



Smith I. : "That chap has a mania for cutting remarks." 

Peene: "What chap?" 

Smith I.: "The fellow who chisels epitaphs on tombstones." 



QUESTIONS NEVER ASKED. 
"Is Blauvelt an American?" 
"Is Russell I. a woman hater?" 
"Can you lend me a dime, Anderson?" 
"Don't you think Charlie Lewis is handsome?" 



Three little chaps from S. A. C. 
Set out one Sunday morning 
With Christie toppers hard as ice 
Their massive domes adorning. 

Three little chaps from S. A. C. 

Bedraggled came in that night 

With Christies crushed to a shapeless mass, 

They'd been to a pink-tea fight. 



72 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Mr. Laidlaw: "Stephenson, how may wives did Henry VIII. 
have?" 

Stephenson I. (counting freight cars) : "Fifty-one, sir." 



LITERARY AND ART NOTES. 
Among the many volumes recently published we are pleased to 
acknowledge the following: 

Helpful Hints for Backward Boys, by McKay and McLachlan. 
These two, in collaboration with Everhart, have achieved wonders, 
and, I believe that every boy that is backward about coming for- 
ward should read it. The chapter on "Streetcar Flirtations" is par- 
ticularly good. 

Prune Whip. By Thomas Aspden. 

The past-rnaster of cubist verse has come forward with a new 
volume of poetry ; this contains a collection of verse taken from the 
author's works written since 1873. The poem, "Hot Dogs and 
Cheese" is worthy of careful reading. 

Wood's Biography of Frank Blauvelt. .03c. 

In this, Wood, the great writer (of lines) likens his subject to 
Samuel Johnston, and treats it as did Boswell, setting down Blau- 
velt's words and actions each day, consequently there are some 
very hot pages in the volume. 

Public Speaking. By Eric Beattie. 

In this little volume, the silver-tongued orator gives some of 
the methods he has found effective in "gripping" an audience. The 
author, who was an eye-witness of the burning of the Parliament 
Buildings in Ottawa, gives several stirring extracts from his fam- 
ous speech on that subject. 

The Telephone: Its Uses and Abuses. By E. Golden Tyrer. 

A masterful work by one with a fair knowledge of the subject. 

Ten Nights in a Barber Shop. By Fred Alcott Bingham. 

A rather sticky treatise on the irrigation of the hair. 

Hockey in the Stone Age. By Jess Carrick. The subject is 
treated in a bold, ruthless manner. An intensely interesting book 
but of doubtful historic value. 



Anderson, the well-blown artist, has been at work on a new 
picture: a portrait of Shirley MacRae. He portrays his subject 
at the dinner table in an attitude of deep thought with a potato 
poised on a fork half-way to his capacious mouth. The pose is re- 
alistic and, although the artist is only a fourth-rater, the picture 
looks well upside down. P. K. Boo. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 73 

Master (shouting to janitor at 1 a.m.) : "Burglar! Burglars! 
Phone for the police." 

Janitor : "Sorry, sir, but Tyrer is still using the phone." 



MUSIC?? 
The great pianist, Pupaw Murchison, gave a recital in the lower 
school reception room. During the concert the pianist found it 
almost impossible to proceed owing to the tributes, floral and other- 
wise, that were thrown through the window at him. 



Chauncey R. Chalker, the tin whistle and own-horn blower, 
aided by Jeff Supple, the bag-pipe performer, gave an enjoyable 
concert to their room-mates on Valentine's Day. 



J. V. Russel, the contra-baritone-basso vocalist, gave a recital 
in the washroom several weeks ago. He was heartily applauded 
(when he went out) . 

Hal A Facts. 



TO MUSIC. 
Thou much abused goddess, 
How art thy powers mocked 
By reckless youth and maidens 
Who have their hearers shocked. 



K. B. C. 



Cameron I. (in sick room) : "Doctor, what's the matter with 
me, anyway?" 

Doctor (looking at Cameron's legs) : "Oh, you're in good health 
but poor shape." 



Supple says: "It is a bad thing to speak of detention and re- 
ligion in the same breath." 



Long toiled the artist at his great picture, and when it was fin- 
ished, millionaires came offering him gold for it. Then he awak- 
ened clutching one of his rotten cartoons to the breast of his dirty 
pyjamas. His name was Anderson. 



Patterson IV.: "What is the inside of a jail like?" 
MacLeod: "I would be able to tell you if my dad hadn't gone 
bail for me." 



74 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

WHAT A PERFECT MASTER WOULD SAY. 
"So you skipped down-town, and was there anything going on 
down there?" 

"You have three double gatings. I'll make it an hour's work." 
"There will be no study to-night at the request of Blauvelt." 



There was a young fejlow called Fred, 
Who for weeks was confined to his bed. 

The Doc. in despair, 

Delved deep in his hair 
And found that his brains were quite dead. 



Mr. Laidlaw: "What English Lord aided the Spanish?" 
Clift: "Lord Helpus, sir." 



Walker: "'Tis love that makes the wheels go around in my 
head." 



McLachlan (to strange girl) : "We have met before, haven't 
we?" 

Girl : "Possibly, my father keeps the zoo." 



CONSOLATION. 
I should like to be a prefect, 
So I could., get some leave, 
And I smile in my desire 
As my golden dreams I weave. 

I could stay up till eleven, 
Get week-ends by the score 
And be always late for breakfast 
Without starting up a war. 

I should like to be a prefect, 
But not (and here's the rub) 
Be the head of any table, 
And give other guys the grub. 



K. B. C. 



Mr. Laidlaw: "What is Trafalgar 9 " 
Anderson: "Sir, a girl's school in Montreal." 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 75 

Armstrong (hearing Johnston at piano) : "He takes his scales 
well." 

Brunt: "It's easy for a fish like him." 



A CHECKERED CONVERSATION. 

Outside the Master's Common Room: "It's my move." — "No 
'tisn't, neither." Toute finis, I'm beaten." — "Two and two make 
four, only twelve left on the board.' — "Let me see if X=Y I should 
win." — "Got two, that time, Brutus." 

By Wil Bur. 



"THE DISCOVERY OF THE ATOM." 
A Semi-Tragedy. 

Place : St. Andrew's Lab. 

Characters: Palmer and Owens (students?) 

Comic Characters : Anderson and Temple. 

Scene I. 

As the curtain rises Palmer is seen holding up to the light a 
test tube containing a piece of chalk. 

Palmer:. "Ah, my efforts at last are crowned with victory!" 

Owens: "At last, at last!" 

Palmer: "My name will go down with Newton's and (consults 
Physics Book) Pascal's." 

Enter Anderson and Temple quarrelling. 

Anderson : "Marconi discovered America." 

Temple : "I tell you it was Jenoby Moore." 

Anderson strikes Temple who retaliates. 

Palmer: "What means the noise behind us?" 

Owens: "But two court jesters, Great Scientist, pay them not 
the slightest heed." 

The struggle continues. Anderson is thrown roughly against 
Palmer knocking the test tube from his hand. The test tube falls 
to the floor and is shattered into many fragments. 

Palmer (tearing his hair) : "Curses! the work of weeks ruined 
by two fools!" 

Curtain. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 
Mrs. Shirley McRae and Mrs. J. Veracity Russell held a recep- 
tion in the school library ; dainty refreshments, consisting of soda- 
biscuit and milk, were served by the prefects. 



76 ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Mr. Don. Patterson, who is starring with the Fleck Film Co., 
visited his old home, 999 Queen St. West, last week. He has re- 
turned to take a lead in a great new picture, "Sitting Out," directed 
by Lew McRae. 



Miss Willhemindher Leask, who represented Branksome at the 
U. C. C. match, wore a gown of deep green cheese-cloth with 
flounces of burlap trimmed with tar paper. 



It is rumoured that Lord Wade Taylor will be appointed Am- 
bassador to the Cannibal Isles in place of Earl Eric Beatty, who has 
retired to spend the rest of his days in the sick room. 



The Ancient Order of Dubs recently held its annual the dansant 
in Herpicide Hall. The Grand Potentate Aspden received. 



A meeting of the Truro Reading Club was held at the home of 
Miss Lou Iss. A charming prune luncheon was served at the close 
of the meeting. Among those present were the Misses Gertrude 
Brunt and Gimme Moore. 



Jaffray, first Duke of Bolton, held a grand levee at his country 
seat, Aspirin Heights. Among the personages attending were 
Comte De Kenner, King Bruce, Field Marshall Armstrong, Mar- 
quis Jake Russell and Sir Shaw. 



An event of the greatest importance to the musical world was 
the banquet tendered by M. Paderewski and M. Rachmaninoff to 
their contemporary M. Murchison, B.V.D. at Bowles' some days 
ago. The service was almost demoralized by M. Murchison's per- 
sistent cry of "Beans With." He proved himself as proficient with 
the souponola as with his beloved piano; finding that he could 
create many new variations in his famous "Prelude to Fish." 



Madame Sissons and her debutante daughter Don-o-vane, at- 
tended the launching of Chalker's new yacht "Night Boat." Miss 
Sissons created a sensation by absconding with the christening 
champagne. 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



LOWER SCHOOL SKITS. 



Fair: "Gee! This soap is hard!" 
Horsfall: "Certainly; it's Castile." 



Herchmer: "Pass the milk, please." 

Noonan: "It's passed your eyes (pasteurized) already." 



There was a young fellow called Smiley, 
I think he's descended from Riley, 

He made us a speech, 

Oh! Gee; 'Twas a peach, 
And I think it stretched more than a milee. 



Bethune broke his tooth playing hockey — but that's not the only 
way he's broke. 



Mr. Tudball (to Lentz) : "Use the word 'notwithstanding' in a 
sentence." 
Lentz : "I wore out my trousers but not with standing." 



Miss Brookes : "Stollmeyer, you put a two cent stamp on a let- 
ter to the United States, and a three cent stamp on one to an ad- 
dress in Toronto !" 

Stollmeyer : "That's all right. I noticed it myself, so I changed 
the address around." 



In these days our pocket money seems like pay for working 
detention. 



Bartram: "How did you like the doughnut I gave you?" 
Lanz: "Fine! I ate the (w)hole of mine." 



Noonan: "I'd like a hair cut, please." 
Barber: "Which one?" 



We know the shape of Skin Hughes' head now. He has had 
his hair cut! 



Mr. Goodman : "What would you make if you mixed saltpetre, 
charcoal and sulphur?" 

Stollmeyer: "Make for the door, sir." 



7 s ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 

Mr. Tudball (in geography class) : "Where do we get bananas 
from, Lentz?" 

Lentz : "From a banana tree." 



Guest (at Cadet Corps dance, to Noonan) : "Do you like danc- 



ing 



?" 



Noonan : "Yes, I'm crazy about it." 
Guest: "Well, why don't you learn?" 



Mr. Tudball (at lunch, to small day boy) : "I hear you like your 
soup !" 



Herchmer: "A little bird told me that this soup was burnt." 
Waitress: "A little bird?" 
Herchmer: "Yes, a swallow." 



Ault: "Weren't those light refreshments great?" 

Campbell: "I think they were too light?" 

Ault: "What makes you think that?" 

Campbell: "Well, Fair was all up in the air over them." 



Mr. Palmer (to Dimlap) : "What are the four seasons?" 
Dunlap : "Pepper, salt, vinegar and mustard." 



Mrs. Montgomery (to nurse) : "Rub Porter well every morning 
with glycerine." 

Nurse: "What shall I use at night, nitroglycerine?" 



Mr. Findlay (in grammar class) : "Why do we put a hyphen 
in bird-cage?" 

Sprott: "For the bird to sit on, sir." 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Toronto Auto Accessories t 

LIMITED 



N. 4292 



J. S. GREEN, 
S.A.C., '07-'08 



M S. GOODERHAM, 
S.A.C., 'OI-'IO 



AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT [ 



598 Yonge Street 



en 



3^a^=^a:a: 



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Distinctive 
Photography 

CHARLES 

AYLETT 

— STUDIO — 

96 Yonge Street 



SITTINGS BY 
APPOINTMENT 



Phone Main 1098 



R. T. MclNTYRE 

BARBER 



Special Attention 

to 

College Boys 



YONGE ST. 



5 minutes wdk from 
Si. Andrew's 



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ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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ROBERTSON BROS. LTD. 
TORONTO 



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:522s: 



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77/£ LUMSDEN BLDG. 

BARBER 
SHOP 

YONGE and ADELAIDE 

(Basement) k-£« 



8 



CHAIRS 

Absolutely Sanitary 



The barbers of this establishment 
are authorized by the proprietor 
to refuse to shave or do any work 
en customers whose faces or? 
scalps give any evidence of in- 
fection whatever. V, Main 2535 J 



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Telephone Main 1269 



PARK 
BROS. 



1 $f)otograpf)erg 



328 K YONGE ST. 
TORONTO CANADA 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




1 






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g>t gnbreto'S College 

Toronto 



1 BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



J. K. Macdonald, Esq. 



VICE-CHAIRMAN: 
Colonel Albert E. Gooderham 



GOVERNORS: 

Rev. Prof. Kilpatrick, D.D. 
Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, M.A., LL.D, 
Sir Joseph W. Flavelle, Bart. 
A D. B. Hanna, Esq. 

Frank A. Rolph, Esq. 
A. M. Campbell, Esq. 



D. A. Dunlap, Esq. 

Thomas Findley, Esq. 

Ralph Connable, Esq. 

W. B. McPherson, Esq. 
\ Albert E. Gooderham, Jr., Esq. 

Lyman P. Howe, Esq. 

Kenneth B. MacLaren, Esq. 
[ Robert J, Gill, Esq. 



t 



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CHAIRMAN: I 



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3 

[ 



H. E. Irwin, Esq., K.C. b 

Sir John C. Eaton 



SI ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



#len Jllator 

651 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 
Residential and Day School for Girls 

Principal-MISS J. J. STUART 

(Successor to Miss Veals) 
Classical Tripos, Cambridge University, England. Large nrell-ventilated house, pleasantly 
situated. Highly qualified start of Canadian and European teachers. The curriculum 
shows close touch with modern thought an! education. Preparation for matriculation 
examinations. Special attention ^iven to individual needs. Outdoor games. 

School Reopens April 5th, 1921 

New Prospectus from Miss Stuart 



-wg- 3WBir -a-ta g -a g s g- 



Telephone Adelaide 102 

The Macoomb Press 
Printing 

THAT GETS RESULTS 

6 JOHNSON STREET TORONTO 

-tg g Taw g- TS-m g s-tr -a r 



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Office Phone M. 2877 Warehouse M. 5236 Produce M. 2390 

STRONACH & SONS 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits Butter, Eg-gfs, Produce of all Kinds 

Apples and Potatoes in Car Lots 

-w r -a-tgm E- 



:K55I 



LET THE 

i British-American Cleaners and Pressers 

LOOK AFTER YOUR CLOTHES 

( )ur Special Students Contracts at $5. 00 for 12 Suits. Guarantees Satisfaction. 
SUITS CALLED FOR AXD DELIVERED. 

485 SPADINA CRESCENT Phone College 5390 

OEI 3»g s. w-gr s g- -ar g- -a-a 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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ii THE STUDENTS 



Men's Furnishing 
House 

Latest Styles — 

Best Qualities 

PRICES RIGHT 

COOPER & CO. 

IMPORTERS 
67 & 69 King St. East 

TORONTO 



SUMMER SFO TS 
AND ATHLETICS 




The approach of spring- arouses the desire 
ol every College Student to get into outdoor 
sports. Look over your equipment now and 
see what you require to participate in — 
CRICK T, TENMS, BASEBALL, FOOTBALL, 
FIELD ATHLETICS, COLF or LACROSSE 

The extensive variety of sundries for these 
and other sports makes selection easy. 

Our 1921 Catalogue, No. 88 contains 144 
pages devoted entirely to sports. Send for 
a copy to-day. 

The HAROLD A. WILSON Co. Ltd 

297-299 YONGE ST., TORONTO 



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BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 



A.D. 1833 



Head Office - TORONTO 

Fire t Marin e, Hail, and Automobile 



W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 
E. F. GARROW, Secretary 



Assets, over ------ 

Losses Paid Since Organization, over 



$4,300,000.00 
$47,500,000.00 



^WBZ 



353 



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WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Automcbile, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes 
Head Office, TORONTO, ONT. Incorporated 1851 



Assets, over ... 

Losses Paid Since Organization, over 



$8,000,000.00 
$77,700,000.00 



W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 



C. S. WAINVVRIGHT, 

Secretary 



A. R. PRINGLE, 

Canadian Fire Manager 



is®®: 



35jjc: 






3 k: 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



J 



flDoSill Tnnivcrsit\> 

MONTREAL 

Agriculture 

Applied Science (For Men) 

Architecture, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, 
Mechanical, Metallurgical, and Mining 
Engineering. 

Arts 

Commerce 

Dentistry 

Household Science (For Women) 

Law 

Medicine 

Music 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education 

School for Graduate Nurses 

(For Women) 

Public Health Nursing for Teachers and 
Supervisors in Schools of Nursing. 

Social Service 

All of the above courses, except those 
otherwise specified, are open to Men and 
Women. 

The Calendar containing full parti- 
culars regarding Matriculation. Courses 
of Study, the work comprised in each 
year, and the details of double courses 
offered, may be obtained from t 

The Registrar. 



zrs: 



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522 



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HYGEIA 

ICE 



is made from city water frozen in 
galvanized steel moulds under 
ideal conditions. All possible im- 
purities are eliminated in the 
special feezing process, and no 
packing material is used to clog 
your refrigerator pipes. It is the 
acme of purity. 

LAKE SIMCOE ICE 

SUPPLY CO., LTD. 

Telephone - Main 86 



SMITH & WALSH 



LIMITED 



R Insurance Brokers 






BANK OF HAMILTON BLDG. 
TORONTO 



" BEST INDEMNITY AT 
MINIMUM COST " 



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F. A. Bowden & Sons 

Established 1880 
Phone Gerrard 220—221 

Retail Lumber 

LATH, SHINGLES, 

SHEETING, SHELVING, 

CRATING, FLAG POLES, 

BEAVER BOARD, Etc. 



Old Boys 

FRANK G. BOWDEN 

HARRY V. BOWDEN" 
ARTHUR (Pat) BOWDEN 



Greenwood Ave. G.T.R. Tracks \ 

TORONTO 



st^l 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




\ BASEBALL, SOCCER, CRICKET, TENNIS [ 
GOLF, TRACK AND FIELD SUPPLIES 



y 



Hawaiian Music is still the rage for popularity in 
Canada and we think its popularity will remain. 
A feature of Hawaiian Music is the ease with 
which the instruments can be learned. 

You can learn to play a Guitar well in 60 days 
and a Ukulele in much less time. 

We have guitars from $7.50 up and L T kuleles 
$3.50 up. 



WILLIAMS 



R. 5. TT 1UU1A1T10 LIMITED 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS OF QUALITY 

145 YONGE STREET - - TORONTO 

Established 1849 



-a-ism g- raw er ^ g -a- g- 



; The Very Best SPORTING GOODS 



Fishing Tackle, Canoes, etc. 
Jerseys, Sweaters and Sweater Coats 



Write for Catalogue. 



PERCY A. McBRIDE 

343-345 YONGE ST., TORONTO. PHONE AD. 6450 



"^g- -a r -am 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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EAT AND ENJOY 

NASMITH'S 
=BREAD= 

It is the bread that 
meals are made of 



For Delivery Phone 
. . . Main 6535 . . . 



42-56 DUCHESS STREET, [ 
TORONTO 



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1253 53 



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Main ' ,4 "' Established 

main , - 4 , )s 



GALLAGHER & CO. 

LIMITED 

Direct Importers and Distributors 

ol 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

FISH and OYSTERS 

to 

Hotels, Clubs and Restaurants 

Hospitals and Colleges 

Railways Dining Car and 
Camp Supplies 

107 KING ST. EAST 
TORONTO 



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: 53531 



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YOU EAT A 



CHRISTIE BISCUIT 



YOU EAT THE BEST 



CHRISTIE, BROWN & CO., LTD., TORONTO 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Established 1864 

JOHN CATTO CO. Ltd. ^ 

Make an interesting exhibit of 

SCOTTISH CLAN and 

FAMILY TARTANS 

In fine saxony cloths in all the principal 
Clan and Family Names. Also in 

Heavy Kilting Cloths 

For the making up of Mens and Youths 
Kilts. 

Highland Costumes 

Made to Order 

We carry all accessories for the complete 
Highland Costumes as Glengarry Caps. 
Balmorals. Tarn O'Shanters. Sporrans, 
Hose, Brooches, Cocktail Feathers, Garters, 
etc., etc. 

Tartan Silk Sashes 

In big range of all the principal Tartans. 

Automobile Rugs 

All Wool reversible Rugs in great variety 
of Clan and Family Names. 



219-23 YONGE ST. 



Corner 
Shuter St. 



TORONTO 






GAGE'S 

H8HAND 

life 

A correspondence paper that 
makes writing a pleasure. 

The beautiful texture and pen- 
inviting surface and the 
fashionable envelopes 
Kft it above all other 
inexpensive writing 
papers. Its use will add 
distinction to your letters. 



Sold iy 
AIL GOOD STATIONERS 



Ed 



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CRICKET, BASEBALL, TENNIS 
LACROSSE SUPPLIES 



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New Spring and Summer Footwear 



J. BROTHERTON 



Phone N. 2092 



580 YONGE ST. 

Open Evenings 



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ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Telephone Main 2912 

James 
Manson 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



32 

Adelaide Street EaSt 
TORONTO 

FINEST SELECTION 
OF SCOTCH TWEEDS 
AND WORSTEDS 



531 
531 

D 



J. J. McLaughlin 

Limited 




"Pest" 
^eberageS 



are for Sale at 

St. Andrew's 
Tuck 

: GINGERS 

SAFEST and BEST 
to DRIXK 



:53 BUZ 



^-g 3r 



23CZ 



3TZZ3T 



HENRY SPROATT, L.L.D., R.C.A. 
ERNEST K. ROLPH. 



353 



53 s: 



SPROATT 
AND ROLPH 

&rd)ttects 



36 NORTH STREET I 
TORONTO 



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Brown Bros. 

Limited 

1 and 3 St. Lawrence Market 

Main 868 
Main 869 

DEALERS IN 

All kinds of Fresh and Salt 
Meats, Hams and Bacons 

Corned Beef a Specialty 
All Kinds of Poultry in Season 

BRANCH 

2 and 4 St. Patrick's Market 

TORONTO 



- 



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23= 



TELEPHONE ADELAIDE 2665 



3^ 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



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COLES 



Caterer 

and— — 

MANUFACTURING 
CONFECTIONER 



8 
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Catering a Specialty 

M 



PHONE N. 154 

7I9 YONGE STREET 
TORONTO 



When You Buy 

CAKES 



Askf 



or 



3JZZ2T 



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Eclipse 

They are the BeSt 



Manufactured by 

Eclipse Baking Co. 

Limited 

TORONTO 

as is g a 



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PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL OR CLASS 



LESSONS BY APPOINTMENT « 



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Mosher Studio of Dancing 

583 Church Street Phone North 4530 

TORONTO 



istBHg-g — ^ag 



SB 



ST. ANDREWS COLLEGE REVIEW 



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Use Our 

Telephone Service jVIore 

Boys 

When you need anything just call up our Boy's Department — ■ 
say whatyou w?nt — and let us do the cheesing for you. You 
can rely on the quality — -and the prices you may depend upon 

to be right with cqu-il confidence. 

We arc always gh d to sec you — and want you to come often — 

but we know there arc times when a fellow really can't "get oft" 

■and we want to suggest that you phone for what ycu need, 

w hen you can't come. 

THE NUMBER IS ADELAIDE 5100 

MURRAY-KAY COMPANY, Limited 

"Everything For Boys" 15-31 King Street East 



55 k: 



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SMART SHOES 
FOR YOUNG MEN 



Shoes for every and eacn 
occasion. The best to be 
had at the price. Made 
to fit as well as to wear. 
Try us for your next pair. 



H. & C. Blachford 

LIMITED 

286 Yonge St., opp. Dundas E. 



A M 

8 55 



TWO STORES 



BOND BROS. 

2)ru<$cjist3 



453 YONGE STREET 

Phone North 350 

Cor. MADISON AVE. 

and DUPONT ST 

Phone Hillcrest 812 



TORONTO 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 



VICTORY BONDS 

On the open Market 

We have opened a special depaitment to take care 
of Victory Loan trading and shall be glad to have 
you correspond, telegraph or telephone at our ex- 
pense for the latest quotations, regardless of the 
amount you may be selling or purchasing. 

BONDS WILL. BE DELIVERED TO ANY 



U 



PART OF CANADA FREE OF EXPENSE fi 

Dominion Securities 
corporation limited 



HEAD OFFICE : TORONTO 26 KING ST. E. 
MONTREAL Established 1901 LONDON, ENG. 



I 



3 53 

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Centra! Canada Loan and Savings Company H 

26 KING STREET EAST, TORONTO t 



CAPITAL (Paid Up) $1,750,000 RESERVE FUND $1,750,000 

Surplus Security for Depositors and Debenture Holders, $4,417,952.00 



LJ 



DEPOSITS received in sums of $1.00 and upwards. Subject 

to cheque withdrawal. 
DEBENTURES issued in sums of $100 and upwards, payable in 

from one to five years, or upon sixty days' f 
notice, and upon which special rates of interest are allowed, 
depending upon the term of investment. These Debentures " 
are authorized as a Trustee Investment by Special Order in 
Council. 

E. R. WOOD, President f 

G. A. MORROW, Vice-President H. C. COX, Vice-President 

A. B. FISHER, Asst. Manager 



ST. ANDREW'S COLLEGE REVIEW 




Games 
Setting 

Fishing 
Shooting 
Camping 
Firs! Aid 
Dramatics 
Swimming 
Life Saving 
Fancy Diving 
Nature Study 
Canoe Cruises 
Sailing Cruises 



Kg CAMP fK 

Kagawonu 

Present indications are thai 

the Camp will again have a 
waiting list this year and old 
boys as well as new boys in- 
tending to enter are requested 
to make application early. 

Eor illustrated booklet and 
further information. 

Address 






E. 


A. CHAPMAN, 

St. Andrew's College 




. Andrew's Boys at Camp 1920 


Boxing 


Allen 11 




Lentz 


Archery 


Ashenhurst 




Lumbrr- 1 1 


Baseball 


Bristol 




Lvon 


Wrestling 


Blauvelt 

Brown I 




McCarter 

MacLennan 


Woodcraft 


Carrick I 




Noriega I 


(rymnastics 


Carrick 1 1 




Noriega II 


Canoeing 


Carrick III 




Power 


Yollev Ball 






Rivera 




Craig 




Rolph 


Captain Ball 


Crowe 




Skeaff 


Photography 


Dennis 




Smart 




Dyment 
Easton 




Sloan 
Smith II 


Athletic Sports 


Fair 




Stollmever I 


Manual Training 


Fleck 




Stollmever II 




Grant II 




Stollmever III 




Grant III 




Stewart I 




Hall I 




Watts 




King 










2H 



The 

Young* Man's 

Shop 

Here's a Young Man's Shop that 
makes a special appeal to the un- 
dergrads with fine hand-tailored 
Clothing and Haberdashery that 
are the first choice of careful 
dressers and careful buyers 
everywhere. 




102 Yon£e St, 
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is made from the finest carefully selected 
cocoa beans, roasted by a special process 
to perfect the rich chocolate flavor. 
Cowan's is most delicious 
and most economical. n 

THE COWAN CO., Limited, TORONTO 



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GHeerful Warmth 
at Mow Cost 



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77ie Radiantfire is a remarkable gas heating 
appliance that should he in every fireplace. 
It can always be depended upon for instant 
warmth. It lights without puffing and burns 
without the trace of an odor. Its ever 
changing opalescent glow is as good to look 
upon as it is effective at heating. 

Considering the efficiency of this gas heater, 
the cost of operation is indeed very small. 



See DISPLAY of RADIANTFIRES 

Sales Dept, 1 9 Toronto Street 

THE CONSUMERS' GAS CO. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS